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Editorial

Ranjan behind bars

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Thursday 14th January, 2021

It is not only greedy eaters who get into trouble because of their tongues, with which they are said to dig their graves; politicians also find themselves in unenviable positions because of their restless tongues, and SJB MP Ranjan Ramanayake may be considered one of them. He will have to languish in jail for four years. The actor-turned-politician put on a bold face while being taken to prison, on Tuesday, but it will not take long for the sobering reality to dawn on him. Sri Lankan prisons are hellholes, to say the least, especially for those whose political enemies happen to be in power. Going to jail is a heroic deed only in the celluloid world. Nothing except a deus ex machina in the form of a presidential pardon can save Ranjan from incarceration.

One tends to take leave of one’s senses, when power goes to one’s head. This is what happened to Ranjan when he was in the yahapalana government. He apparently thought he enjoyed legal immunity, and the sky was the limit as he was very close to the leaders of that administration. It was near Temple Trees that he made the controversial statement which led to his jail term. If only he had cut out theatrics and acted sensibly.

Ranjan was on friendly terms with some judges if his leaked telephone recordings are anything to go by. In some of his voice clips, he is heard making inquiries from judges about matters related to court cases and offering favours. The conduct of the judicial officers concerned is beyond the pale. Every profession has its share of bad eggs. Ranjan made the mistake of coming out with a sweeping statement about the judiciary, in public, causing as he did an affront to the dignity of the entire institution.

Ranjan should have learnt from what befell S. B. Dissanayake, who committed contempt of court by making a derogatory statement about a Supreme Court judgment and had jail time imposed on him. Instead, he repeated his statement at issue. The Supreme Court took this fact into consideration in arriving at its decision. Somebody should have warned Ranjan.

Opinion may be divided on the severity of the punishment Ranjan has received, but hereafter the MPs who consider their privileges are a licence for them to insult others will be constrained to exercise control over their tongues at least outside Parliament. The Supreme Court judgment under discussion serves to redefine the way people exercise their freedom of expression, which is generally abused in this country, especially by politicians.

The significance of some remarks Ranjan made before being bundled into a prison vehicle, on Tuesday, may not have been lost on the discerning public. He said he had not committed murder or theft, but he had been sentenced to jail while MP ‘Pillayan’ was being released.

SLPP MP and former Eastern Province Chief Minister S. Chandrakanthan, popularly known as Pillayan, who was kept in remand prison over the assassination of TNA MP Joseph Pararajasingham, has been acquitted as the Attorney General’s Department decided not to proceed with the case against him and several others. Why did the AG’s Department wait so long to take that decision? Pillayan was in remand prison for five years. Why was legal action instituted against him, in the first place? Will Pillayan sue those who had him arrested and remanded? If not, why?

There is something Ranjan did not mention. A group of lawyers who ran amok in the Colombo High Court, smashing furniture, hurling abuse at the beleaguered judges including a female, and threatening them, after the judgment in the White Flag case was delivered, on 18 Nov. 2011, went scot- free. The police had to remove the judges in a state of shock to safety as the lawyers protesting against their judgement turned menacingly aggressive. The black-coated rioters should have been prosecuted for contempt of court; it would have been an open-and-shut case.

Ranjan has got four years RI for making a derogatory statement about the judiciary, and those who damaged court furniture and threatened judges would have received a much severer punishment if they had been tried. The culprits are practising law! Is it that the lawyers are above the law?

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Editorial

Of those walls

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Friday 22nd January, 2021

Walls are meant to ensure safety. Most houses in this country have boundary walls that are as tall as those around prisons, for there are more criminals at large than behind bars, and the law-abiding people fear for their safety. But walls can also be a source of danger if they are jerrybuilt or happen to sit in the wrong places like the one along a section of the perimeter of the Ratmalana Airport near the Galle road. A veteran Sri Lankan pilot, who writes to this newspaper under a pseudonym, has been striving for the last 10 years or so to have this wall pulled down because he believes it poses a danger to aircraft. He has written many articles putting forth solid arguments for the demolition of the wall, but in vain; the last one appeared yesterday. One may argue that the airport wall has caused no accidents so far and, therefore, one should not worry, but anything that is a potential danger to aircraft should not be permitted in or around airports.

Walls could cause trouble on the political front as well. Donald Trump was left with egg on his face when he, as the US President, tried to have a wall built along the US-Mexico border. That wall never came up, and Trump has had to leave the White House. Walls that political leaders allow to be built around them could also be problematic.

Many of those who campaigned really hard to bring the incumbent Sri Lankan government to power are now climbing the walls. Their frustration knows no bounds. They think a favoured few have built a wall around President Gotabaya Rajapaksa and are misleading him. This is what, some prominent Buddhist monks who led the SLPP’s election campaigns from the front say, has happened.

Several senior Buddhist monks flayed the government at a religious function held on Wednesday to invoke blessings on Ven. Omare Kassapa Thera on his birthday, at Abayaramaya, Colombo. Ven. Murutettuwe Ananda, Ven. Medagama Abhayatissa and Ven. Elle Gunawansa Theras, in their speeches decried the way the government was mismanaging state assets which it had undertaken to protect. They said their voice had gone unheeded as some persons had built a wall around the President. Medagama Abhayatissa Thera recalled how a group of Buddhist monks had protested when Hambantota Port was leased to the Chinese; he said the Maha Sangha would go all out to save the East Container Terminal (ECT) of the Colombo Port.

One may recall that Ranil Wickremesinghe, as the Prime Minister of the yahapalana government, derisively called Abayaramaya ‘Mahindaramaya’ because it was there that ex-President Mahinda Rajapaksa successfully rallied forces to make a comeback following his defeat in the 2015 presidential race. Today, staunch SLPP supporters are raking the government over the coals at the very temple, which served as the cradle of their anti-yahapalana campaign.

Gotabaya, as the Secretary to the Ministry of Urban Development, once demonstrated a deep antipathy towards walls. He had some of them pulled down in the Colombo city as part of his urban yuppification programme. But he is now under fire from government supporters for having allowed a wall to be built around him.

The wall of mistrust that has come up between the SLPP and its supporters, who show signs of utter disillusionment and frustration, presages trouble for the government, which has earned notoriety for signaling left and turning right, so to speak. The questionable ECT deal which has irked the forces that propelled it to power could be its undoing.

Defensive walls could fail to be effective in politics as in football, where skilled players know how to curve the ball past them into the goal. What Maithripala Sirisena did to his boss, Mahinda, in the 2015 presidential contest, is a case in point. It was a real kicker for the latter.

Most political leaders tend to forget, after being ensconced in power, that walls around them are no match for the power of people’s voice. They ought to remember that all it took to bring down the Wall of Jericho was a great shout people raised in unison.

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Editorial

Virus and moral failure

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Thursday 21st January 2021

The world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure, World Health Organisation (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has warned, at a recent WHO Executive Board meeting, adding that more than 39 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in about 49 high-income countries while only 25 doses have been administered in one lowest-income country. We believe that the catastrophic moral failure has already set in. The WHO chief is right in insisting that equitable access to vaccines is not only a moral imperative but also an economic and strategic imperative, and failure to ensure it will only lead to the prolongation of the pandemic. However, he has not mentioned that not a single dose of vaccine has been administered in most countries, Sri Lanka being one of them.

Ghebreyesus has not named the lowest-income country where only 25 doses of the vaccines have so far been administered. It must be in the African continent if one hazards a guess by using GDP per capita as a yardstick. Paradoxically, the African countries are the richest in the world in terms of the value of their mineral deposits and other natural resources. They remain poor due to the plunder of their resources, which find their way into the West. The African nations have the world’s largest amount of gold, but this fact is not reflected in their currencies which are amongst the weakest in the world. Industries and banks in the developed world are heavily dependent on the exploitation of resources in Africa and funds generated therefrom. If the illegal trade of diamonds, gold, coltan, etc., is stopped, many corporations and banks in the West will go belly up. Exploiters are having the first dibs on the vaccine, and their victims have been left to their fate.

Meanwhile, one interesting aspect of the current global health emergency is that it has brought about a situation where the people of the Global North have become guinea pigs for Big Pharma. Time was when their counterparts in the developing world were used as experimental groups. It may be recalled that Pfizer had to pay millions of US dollars as compensation to the parents of a group of Nigerian children who died due of one of its drug trials. Today’s controversy over Pfizer products is reported from the developed world; in Norway, 29 elderly people have died after receiving the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

Given this situation, the Sri Lankan government, which is trying to procure the COVID-19 vaccines from several sources, had better heed the opinion of the Vaccine and Infectious Diseases Forum (VIDF) of Sri Lanka, consisting of reputed medical experts, if disaster is to be averted. The VIDF has said in a media statement: “With the current dilemma of vaccine efficacy and safety issues and the uncertainty of the claims made by individual vaccine manufacturers, we fully understand the need to strictly apply the standard procedure of approval of any medicinal product in this country for approving a vaccine for COVID-19 in Sri Lanka too and wish to endorse the need for our regulatory authorities to act accordingly.” (See page five for the VIDF statement.)

The developed world is promoting human rights globally and resorts to punitive action such as sanctions to make others respect and protect them. The right to life takes precedence over everything else. Humans are faced with an existential problem due to the pandemic, which snuffs out thousands of lives daily. It is, therefore, up to the nations that have taken upon themselves the task of protecting human rights to practise what they preach, and help save lives by ensuring equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine across the world.

It is hoped that the absence of equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines and the developed world’s inoculation frenzy at the expense of a vast majority of the global population will be taken up at the upcoming UNHRC sessions in Geneva. What we are witnessing is discrimination against the poor on a global scale. It could even be considered a form of apartheid. The outspoken WHO Chief should be invited to address the UNHRC so that there will be at least one useful item on the outfit’s agenda, which reeks with prejudice and duplicity.

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Editorial

ECT, Port City and Potemkin village

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Wednesday 20th January, 2021

The East Container Terminal (ECT) dispute remains unresolved. Protesting port workers have rejected a government condition for negotiations as a Hobson’s choice; they have said the government has offered to discuss the issue, provided they agree to consider the proposed joint venture between the Sri Lanka Ports Authority and India’s Adani Group as non-negotiable. Having further talks on the government’s terms will be tantamount to an endorsement of the ECT deal, the protesters have said.

The warring port workers are likely to harden their position further and even flex their trade union muscles. This is something the country cannot afford at this juncture, but the government has sought to play a game of chicken. The economy cannot take any more shocks, and a port strike will send it into a tailspin.

Praise for the government has come from an unexpected quarter. Former Minister Mangala Samaraweera, one of the bitterest critics of the government, has commended it for having struck the ETC deal with India; in the former’s eyes the latter can never do anything right, but both of them are on the same wavelength where the questionable joint venture is concerned! Bashing the government is the raison d’etre of most NGOs, which are all out to have pariah status conferred on the present-day leaders for the country’s successful war on terror, but curiously they too have showered praise on the government for the proposed ECT joint venture with Adani Group as a partner!

Interestingly, the forces that propelled the SLPP to power are now berating the government for the ECT deal, which, they say, is detrimental to Sri Lanka’s interests. Those who did their darnedest to have the SLPP defeated at the last two elections and are hell bent on demonising its leaders as enemies of democracy are supporting it on the ECT agreement. Thus, the government is receiving praise from its enemies and brickbats from its allies! What has caused this strange realignment of forces?

Adani Group, which is the Modi government’s most favoured company, has come under heavy criticism for the rapaciousness of its business practices both at home and abroad. Protesting Indian farmers have blamed it for their woes, and in Australia it stands accused of employing environmentally destructive methods in mining. In India, the Central Bureau of Investigation has booked the Adani Enterprises Ltd, which is considered the flagship company of Adani Group, for securing a government contract for supplying imported coal in an allegedly fraudulent manner. Sri Lankan politicians love to do business with such companies!

One of the main election pledges of the SLPP was to form a ‘patriotic government and undo what the yahapalana administration had done. But it has chosen to jettison its patriotism and follow the yahapalana policy on state assets, as evident from its decision to partner with a foreign company to operate the ECT, which the Sri Lanka Ports Authority is capable of managing on its own as a profitable venture. As for the ECT, the incumbent government has done exactly what the yahapalana regime did anent the Chinese Port City. The previous administration vowed to scrap the Chinese project, condemning it as an environmental disaster, but approved it in the end.

The government has said it will attract foreign investment without either selling or leasing the ECT; this is only an impressive façade that hides an unpleasant situation, or Potemkin village as political scientists call it.

If the SLPP leaders ignore the fate that awaits those who strike deals with companies notorious for questionable business practices, they will do so at their own peril. They ought to learn from the predicament of the UNP leaders who had dealings with Perpetual Treasuries, which carried out the Treasury bond scams.

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