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Editorial

Grinding arrogance

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Saturday 2nd October, 2021

The government has finally bitten the bullet and issued a new Gazette cancelling the previous one which stipulated maximum retail prices (MRPs) for rice. Whoever would have thought a powerful regime with a two-thirds majority in Parliament and former battle-hardened frontline combat officers in key positions would ever suffer such humiliation at the hands of a few businessmen from Polonnaruwa?

Dudley Sirisena has done, as a rice miller, what his elder brother Maithripala failed to do as the Executive President; he has humbled the Rajapaksas! After securing the presidency, in 2015, Maithripala did everything in his power to tame the Rajapaksa family; the yahapalana government, under his leadership, went to the extent of having some members of the Rajapaksa family probed, remanded and prosecuted, but to no avail. Maithripala failed in his endeavour in spite of being assisted by the UNP, a section of the SLFP, the TNA, the SLMC, the western bloc and many others. The Rajapaksas turned the tables on him and the UNP-led government and captured power again. Today, Maithripala is only an ordinary MP playing second fiddle to the Rajapaksas. But his sibling, Dudley, with the help of only a few millers, has brought the Rajapaksa government to its knees. This is no mean achievement for a miller from Polonnaruwa.

When the government declared Emergency regulations, a few weeks ago, and ordered raids to trace and seize hoarded paddy and rice, after issuing a Gazette announcing the MRPs for rice, the Millers’ Mafia retaliated by starving the market. The Consumer Affairs Authority did its darnedest to make rice available, but in vain. The powerful millers held out against the government, which, unable to have its order carried out, ran around like a headless chicken for a while, threatening to import rice, before conceding defeat to the Millers’ Mafia to all intents and purposes. Now, rice is freely available but at prices determined by the powerful millers.

Rubbing salt into the wound, a triumphant Dudley went so far as to announce the MRPs for paddy, at a media briefing, which is reported to have attracted as many hits as President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s recent address to the United Nations General Assembly! Curiously, an otherwise pugnacious government has baulked at reacting.

How the government heroes including Agriculture Minister Mahindananda Aluthgamage, who embarked on a mission to defeat the Millers’ Mafia and did a lot tilting at rice mills, may have felt on watching Dudley on television, is anybody’s guess. They are not sighted in public these days.

Farmers were at a disadvantage when they had to sell their paddy at prices stipulated by the government. They said they could have disposed of their produce at much higher prices but for the government intervention. The Millers’ Mafia purchased paddy at lower prices at the expense of the farmer, thanks to the government, and is selling rice at higher prices at the expense of the consumer. They have got the best of both worlds! Has anyone other than the unscrupulous millers stood to gain? What is playing out seems to be a bigger racket than the Sathosa garlic scandal. (Where is the Opposition?)

If Prabhakaran knew the victory of the Millers’ Mafia he would regret that he ever resumed hostilities over a mini reservoir by closing a sluice gate, and think he would have been able to tame the Rajapaksa government if he, too, had set up a rice mill in Polonnaruwa instead of fighting a war. One only hopes the various Mafias in other sectors will not emulate the Polonnaruwa millers.

It is now patently clear that the government is not equal to the task of taming a cartel of millers, and a local cooking gas company which has left its customers high and dry. How bad the situation will be in case of a dispute between Sri Lanka and New Fortress, a US energy firm, which has been allowed to have the monopoly over the LNG supply to power plants here, is not difficult to imagine.



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Editorial

When chickens come home …

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Tuesday 19th October, 2021

The world is mourning the death of a senior British lawmaker. The coldblooded murder of Sir David Amess, which shook the world, has been widely condemned. The British government lost no time in calling the savage crime an act of terrorism, and the British MPs declared equally fast that terror would not win. They no doubt mean what they say anent the assassination of Sir David and threats to them as well as their country’s national security, but the question is whether they have the same concern for the other nations affected by terror.

Scientists who experiment with dangerous germs to produce biological weapons run the risk of being hoist with their own petard. The same could be said of the powerful countries that use terrorism to advance their hidden agendas, Britain is no exception. It has been harbouring various terror activists, and some of its MPs are unashamedly abusing their positions to help further the interests of foreign terrorist groups in return for votes and other such favours.

Following the killing of Sir David, there have been strident calls for stern action against terrorism. They must be heeded. Curiously, this is not the way Britain reacted to the assassination of Sri Lanka’s Foreign Minister Lakshman Kadirgamar in 2005, or the killing of any other political leader for that matter. It together with the other self-appointed Co-Chairs of what was then known as Sri Lanka’s peace process pressured Colombo to continue to negotiate with the LTTE, which killed Kadirgamar. That the LTTE had assassinated President Ranasinghe Premadasa, Opposition Leader Gamini Dissanayake, former Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and a large number of Sri Lankan Tamil political leaders also did not matter to the UK, and other western nations.

Britain’s counterterror strategy has not worked. It was to safeguard British national security interests that the UK joined forces with the US to wage war on Afghanistan. In 2009, the then British PM Gordon Brown publicly called the Afghan mission a ‘patriotic duty’ to keep the streets of Britain safe from terror attacks. His Foreign Secretary David Miliband also maintained that the Afghan war would ensure the safety of Britain. But they thought wrong.

Much is being spoken about the radicalisation of some Muslim youth, who carry out terrorist attacks in various parts of the world, and the role that the ISIS plays therein. The UK, the US and their allies must take responsibility for creating conditions for the emergence of ISIS, through their invasion of Iraq. The West has also provided a perfect foil for Islamic extremists by carrying out hostile campaigns against the Muslims. If the US had cared to develop Afghanistan after achieving its strategic goal of getting rid of the Russians from that country, the Taliban would not have been able to emerge so powerful. The UK and the US also provided assistance to terror groups in Iraq and Syria and thereby facilitated the development of the ISIS terror network. In 2015, the UK suddenly terminated criminal proceedings against a man accused of being involved in terrorism in Syria, when it became known that the British intelligence had provided arms and other military assistance to the terrorist group, of which the accused had been a member!

It is high time the British Parliament realised the danger of its members being swayed by the agents of terrorists, who offer votes, etc., in return for various favours they receive. The need for the UK to abandon its double standards on terrorism cannot be overemphasised. Chickens come home to roost.

Terrorism is an evil—never a justifiable means to an end—which must be eliminated in all its forms and manifestations for the sake of humanity. Time was when the western powers laboured under the delusion that they were too strong to be affected by terrorism, which they were using to further their interests, but today they have become as vulnerable as others. The World Health Organization’s pithy slogan as regards the current pandemic is applicable to the scourge of terrorism as well: No country is safe until every country is safe.

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Editorial

Leave animals alone!

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Monday 18th October, 2021

A move to set up a zoo on a 72-acre land (in Piliyandala), which has been allocated for the construction of a veterinary hospital, and a factory to manufacture food for zoo animals, has incensed the Dehiwala zoological gardens workers. The protesters have blamed Minister of Power Gamini Lokuge for the controversial zoo project, and warned of trade union action if he is allowed to have his way. They are reported to have made representations to Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa in this regard. Lokuge’s response to the zoo workers’ protests was not known at the time of writing.

Minister Lokuge is one of the senior politicians who have, to borrow a one-liner from Bob Hope, reached ages when candles cost them more than their birthday cakes. It is high time they concentrated on meritorious deeds more than anything else, and showed some compassion towards dumb animals whose rights must be safeguarded. Lokuge and other government worthies ought to heed what Arahat Mahinda told King Devanampiyatissa: “King, you are only a custodian of this land held in trust. Not only human beings but also wild animals and birds have the right to move freely in this land.”

It may be recalled that Minister Lokuge made a song and dance when the Kesbewa public health officials imposed travel restrictions in the Piliyandala area, which had become a Covid-19 hotspot, a few moons ago. He had their decision reversed immediately and the area reopened because he did not want his supporters’ movements restricted in his electorate. But he wants hundreds of animals held in a prison for life in the same electorate.

A zoo is an animal prison, which should have no place in the civilised world. Animals must be allowed to live in their natural habitats free from human interference. Human interventions are permissible only when they are aimed at saving animals in danger. Many species are endangered because humans destroy their habitats such as forests depriving them of food and water. This is the main reason for the human-elephant conflict in this country. When the affected wild animals invade human settlements in search of food and water they are killed. The incumbent government seems to have a problem with animal habitats, especially forests. We have recently reported, quoting a senior environmentalist, that the government has decided to hand over 6% of the land in the Anuradhapura District to a private company for cultivating Aloe Vera. This deal is bound to worsen the human-elephant conflict in the area.

There are other reasons for wild animal invasions, we pointed out in a previous comment, quoting Dr. Nishan Sakalasooriya of the University of Kelaniya, who has said that the prolonged neglect of forest tanks or kuluwew built for special purposes such as storing rainwater, enriching groundwater level, providing water for wild animals, maintaining the food chain, etc., has caused the problem of wild elephants, monkeys, porcupines, giant squirrels and wild boar invading village ecosystems and threatening the settlers in an unprecedented manner. Insects, rats and snakes also enter residential and farming areas as a result, he has said, concluding that if the kuluwew are renovated systematically and forest ecosystems restored, the wild animal threat can be reduced by about 80 percent. Instead of doing so, the government is alienating forest land for plantations and encouraging its henchmen to encroach on animal habitats.

When a human is wrongfully detained, there erupt protests, and rightly so; fundamental rights petitions are filed, and street demonstrations held to pressure the state to release the victim. But the rights of animals are taken for granted; thousands of them are held in ‘prions’ in this country, but no action is taken against the perpetrators.

The practice of animals being used as exhibits must be discontinued. They are not there to be kept in cages or in ‘open prisons’ for people to have the pleasure of viewing. They must be able to live freely in forests and other such habitats where they belong.

As for the Piliyandala land, where Lokuge reportedly wants animals imprisoned, we have a suggestion; an open-air prison should be set up there for the politicians who abuse their power to commit various crimes, steal public assets, and have become a threat to society.

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Editorial

Will exposés become fish wrappers?

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Journalists the world over are familiar with an expression worn thin over decades and more: ‘yesterday’s news is only fit to wrap the fish in!’ That’s exactly what’s happened to the Pandora Papers that made big news a few days ago in this country and many others globally who’s leaders/citizen had been fingered. A week later, with three weeks yet to go for the Commission to Investigate Allegations of Bribery and Corruption to respond to President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s one month’s deadline for a report, the whole business is nearly forgotten. Hardly a bleat is heard. Readers would remember that the Panama Papers where a massive data base of some 11.5 million files from Mossac Fonseca, the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm made global waves; and a number of Lankans and companies incorporated here were named. But this is now less than a dim memory. That was over five years ago and, as far as we know nothing much has happened since, anywhere, about that exposé, also by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. Will that material, and this, eventually become fish wrappers?

However that be, there are many matter that arise that deserve attention not only from governments but also from the wider public. All of us are aware of the numbered bank accounts that have made Swiss banks both rich and famous. Such accounts, with multi-digit numbers known only to the client and selected bankers, add another layer to banking secrecy. But they are not completely anonymous. That’s because the name of the client is still recorded by the bank and is subject to what’s called “limited warranted disclosure.” Such hiding holes are widely sought by the wealthy to stash away both legitimate and ill-gotten wealth from the prying eyes of governments, law enforcement agencies, taxpeople and sometimes even spouses. Lesser known is the fact that such facilities are no longer the exclusive preserve of the Swiss. They are now available in over a dozen countries in Europe, Africa and Asia. Apart from numbered bank accounts, there are many tax havens in several parts of the world widely used for both money laundering and tax avoidance. They are useful not only to those anxious to exploit their possibilities but also to the service-providing countries to enrich national coffers.

Since the Pandora Papers hit the headlines, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan has made several noteworthy speeches into the expose` which linked hundreds of Pakistanis, including members of his cabinet to wealth secretly moved through offshore companies. Khan has promised action if wrongdoing is established just as much as our own president has done. Ownership of offshore holding companies is not illegal in most countries including, we believe, Sri Lanka. But they are frequently used to avoid tax liability or to maintain secrecy about large and shady financial transactions. Even before the smelly stuff hit the fan with the publication of the Pandora Papers, Khan addressing the UN International Financial Accountability, Transparency and Integrity Panel called upon countries he termed tax havens to “adopt decisive actions” and return wealth looted from developing countries. Saying that the figures were staggering, he estimated that perhaps a trillion dollars were siphoned off in this manner and much of that were bribes received by corrupt white collar criminals. Demanding that the bleeding of poor and developing countries must stop, he urged that stolen assets of developing countries including proceeds of corruption, bribery and other crimes must be returned immediately.

Where Sri Lanka is concerned, the liberalization of the economy in 1978, not 1977 as commonly stated, resulted not only in devaluation of the currency and the stupendous increase in the money supply, but also the commencing of massive and expensive infrastructure and other development projects of which the Accelerated Mahaweli Development was perhaps the largest. This resulted in the award of gigantic contracts on a scale previously not known in this country. Such contracts also meant commissions, and what these were and who collected them was largely unknown. Since then we have had many other very large projects. While the country knows what the taxpayer paid for these as revealed in the figures presented to parliament and budgeted for, what kind of commissions were paid and to whom, is information largely outside the public domain. While decision-making politicians and perhaps bureaucrats are widely suspected to have been beneficiaries of such loot, companies, some well known and others less so, have been identified as agents of various contractors. Whether such funds were duly accounted for and the taxes thereon paid remains unknown.

Whistles have been blown here but we have unfortunately not been able to obtain the cooperation, for example of the Government of the United Arab Emirates about loot allegedly stashed in Dubai. Nobody can expect companies providing haven to ill-gotten gains to cooperate with bloodhounds on their trail. Imran Khan’s appeal to tax haven providers can only fall on deaf years as has happened before and will continue to happen in the future. Third world countries claiming to pursue criminals who had bled their economies will only do so if the quarry belongs to an opposing camp. Governments will only chase opponents and when they change, investigations already undertaken, not without influence of ruling powers, will be abandoned as we have too often seen. As the late Sunil Perera of the Gypsies so memorably sang, Lankawa ehema thamai, I don’t know why!

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