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The poem Neruda never wrote

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In an exclusive interview with the Sunday Island, film maker Asoka Handagama shares the story behind his latest film- Alborada (The Dawning of the Day) inspired by the celebrated poet Pablo Neruda’s stay here as the Chilean Consul. The film is to be internationally premiered at the 34th edition of the Tokyo International Film Festival opening on October 30.

by Randima Attygalle

It is the year 1929. Young Chilean poet and diplomat Pablo Neruda whose fame preceded him arrives in the British-occupied Ceylon as the Chilean Consul. By then Neruda, had already become an international literary celebrity. His work, Twenty Love Poems and Song of Despair was among the bestselling books of poetry in the 20th century. He was called ‘the poet of the people, the oppressed and the forgotten.’

The activist-Consul arrives in Ceylon, barely 25 and empty-handed except for his memory of the disengaged relationship with his former Burmese lover, Josie Bliss. She was obsessively devoted to Neruda and possessed by an overwhelming jealousy. Neruda who called Josie ‘a love terrorist’ and ‘a species of Burmese Panther’ would document in his memoir: (completed shortly before his death in 1973) ‘Sometimes a light would wake me, a ghost moving on the other side of the mosquito net. It was Josie, flimsily dressed in white, brandishing her long, sharp knife. It was she, walking round and round my bed, for hours at a time, without quite making up her mind to kill me. When you die, she used to say to me, my fears will end.’

While his ‘Bliss’ was turning into a taunting jealousy, Neruda receives a cable from Santiago informing him of his immediate transfer to Ceylon. Welcoming his emancipation from his lover, Neruda settles in a beach-front cottage in Wellawatte and is taken care of by a man servant.

He attempts to bury his memories in the vast tropical shores and takes refuge in an atmosphere of solitude he creates for himself. In his memoir is a chapter dedicated to his stay in Ceylon titled Luminous Solitude where he writes: ‘each morning I was overpowered by the miracle of newly cleansed nature.’

Neruda was soon found in the artistic inner circles of Colombo. He was acquainted with Lionel Wendt and George Keyt. The young Chilean poet had a bevy of female admirers whom he called ‘dusky and golden girls of Boer, English and Dravidian blood.’ They bedded him ‘sportingly, asking for nothing in return,’ as he documents.

The young diplomat was infatuated with a Tamil woman of a low caste who came every day at dawn to clean his outdoor latrine. He found her to be the most beautiful woman he had seen in Ceylon. To win her attention, Neruda left her gifts of fruit or silk on the path leading to the latrine, but she took no notice of them. One day he gripped her by the wrist and stared into her eyes. ‘Unsmiling, she let herself be led away and soon was naked in my bed. Her waist, so very slim, her full hips, the brimming cups of her breasts made her like one of the thousand-year-old sculptures from the south of India. … She kept her eyes wide open all the while, completely unresponsive. She was right to despise me. The experience was never repeated.’

The act became a subject of international scrutiny in later years, even prompting a reassessment of the Nobel Laureate’s merit. Neruda who was celebrated as ‘the greatest poet in the 20th century in any language’ by Gabriel Garcia Marquez was even labeled a ‘rapist’. Activists challenged his documentation of ‘she let herself be led away’ as a blatant lie. The decision to rename Chile’s busiest Santiago International Airport after Neruda was met with outrage from human rights activists who argued that the honour was inappropriate for a man who admitted to rape in his own memoirs.

“Although there are many accounts of Neruda’s life portrayed in fiction and film, this part of the story is often carefully left out. Though his poems about love outwardly sound romantic, they hide within them the eroticization and objectification of women and particularly, women of colour,” reflects the film-maker Asoka Handagama whose latest film Alborada (The Dawning of the Day) is an elaboration of Neruda’s controversial sexual assault.

The film which is to hold its world premiere in Tokyo (Oct. 30 – Nov. 8) is a fictionalized account of Neruda’s stay in Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) from 1929 to 1931 as the Chilean Consul. The film explores the psychological and the emotional factors behind Neruda’s attraction to a woman bound by her caste: a woman considered to be ‘untouchable’, unknown to her playing a part in a bizarre fantasy that ended in a sexual assault.

A fan of Neruda’s poetry, Handagama found the poet’s mixed element of art and controversy a tempting subject for a film script. The script which was inspired by Neruda’s Memoirs is a fruit of 10 years of research on the poet. Handagama left his position as a Deputy Governor of the Central Bank three years before his formal retirement age to complete what he calls his ‘dream film.’

A rebel himself with his cinematic expression, Handagama intrepidly unearths the famed poet’s often interred infamous chapter in what he calls an ‘ironic act.’ “It is ironic that an Asian film-maker, coming from a so called restrained cultural landscape is throwing light on Neruda’s sexual antics when all the while Western cinema makers and fiction writers chose to leave them out in the exposition of him,” smiles Handagama.

Reference to Neruda’s Burmese lover Josie Bliss in his poetry is plenty although she is widely regarded as a figment of the poet’s imagination, notes the film maker. “The depiction of her as a perceived threat, a desire and barbarity in his poem Widower’s Tango, combined with his confession show Neruda’s complicated relationship with women and race.” However, no poem of Neruda’s alludes to the ‘untouchable woman’ by whom he was smitten, despite being described as the ‘most beautiful Ceylonese woman’ or one resembling a ‘thousand-year-old sculpture’ from South India. Handagama’s tagline for his film, The poem Neruda never wrote validates this exclusion. It is also an allegorical reminder of the poet’s element which many tended to discount.

Alborada reinvents the rustic west coast of the island Neruda saw in the 1930s. This was no easy task says its creator. “We had to recreate Wellawatta of his time and this was not possible within Colombo due to the changing skyline. We set it up in Nonagama and in Ranminithenna Tele-Cinema Village.”

Lending a cinematic interpretation to an isolated incident at home which is unfamiliar to the authentic Sri Lankan film print, Alborada is to be a refreshing new experience for the local audience. The film also hopes to spur a public discourse, says its director. Starring Spanish actor Luis J Romero as Neruda and French actress Anne Solene Hatte as Josie, the dialogues are in English with Sinhala and Tamil subtitles. The film also debuts several artistes. The main cast comprises Rithika Kodithuwakku (Tamil woman), Malcolm Machado (Neruda’s man servant), Dominic Keller (Lionel Wendt), Nimaya Harris (Patsy), Thusitha Laknath, Kaushalya Mendis, Samantha Balasuriya, Kasun Perera and Kanchana Nandani. Edited by Ravindra Guruge, the film is produced by H.D. Premasiri.

The Tokyo International Film Festival (TokyoIFF) which will feature Alborada is among the invited films for its ‘international competition’ which is the highlight of the festival. Multi-award winning French screen and stage actress Isabelle Huppert will chair the competition jury. This year’s theme of TokyoIFF is ‘Crossing Borders’. “There are plenty of international film festivals today. But only 14 of them are regarded as ‘A-Grade film festivals. TokyoIFF is one of them and the only Asian festival to get this recognition so far,” remarks Handagama. This year’s festival will be opened with the world premiere of Clint Eastwood’s latest film Cry Macho.



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Olu Swim Week

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Olu Swim Week Colombo is Asia’s first swim fashion platform, showcasing the best of Sri Lankan, regional and international swim wear designers.

A brainchild of Ajay Vir Singh Managing director of Colombo Fashion Week, Colombo Swim Week luxury wear collection aims to create a global platform for local designers and create a benchmark for Sri Lanka as the swimwear capital of the world. The golden beaches, the beautiful greenary, gushing waterfalls are an ideal location for in Sri Lanka to showcase this luxury collection

This sixth edition of Olu swim week focused on luxury resort war reflecting on the festive season of December and destination wedding. Under the “New Normal” the designers paid attention on all aspects of sustainability.

Ajay stated earlier in a press conference “There were interesting and challenging limits for any industry with lockdowns and Covid-19 curfews We had to make many changes,designers have to focus on the environment to create designs in the ‘New normal’.

This year the sixth edition of swimwear was held at the Shangri -la Hotel in an elegant and beautiful ambience.

The ‘New Normal’ certainly has challenges but it also presented new opportunities to bring a shift in the mindset and positive vibes into society.

Top designers like Aslam Hussein, Charini Suriyage, Dinushi Pamanuwa presented their collections. The designs were in vibrant colours, jaw dropping styles on models of all sizes and body types.

Now that the world is opening for travel, Sri Lanka provides an ideal location for beach getaways, tropical vacation and stay on point with swimwear trends all season along.

Despite the heavy rain, the sixth edition of the Fashion Week was a spectacular evening amidst much glitz and glamour. The glamour quotient of the show was when model Daniella Kerkovan on the electrifying ramp in a bridal silhouette designed by Aslam Hussein. There were great highs of oomph and allure when Aslam presented his luxury swimwear collection which included a variety of styles in terms of drapes, designs, and elegant cuts.

On the second say Olu swimwear was held at the Port city against the backdrop of stunning skyscapers and yatchs.

Pix by Dharmasena Welipitiya

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“Nelum Kole Rice” at Galadari

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Galadari Colombo has launched “Nelum Kole Rice” promotion at lunchtime at the Blue Lotus restaurant every Sunday from 12 noon to 3.00 pm, a press release announced.

A range of traditional rice served on a lotus leaf such as “Olu Rice”, Kuruluthuda Rice”, “Suwandel” and much more is on offer with a selection of fish, prawns, chicken, beef, mutton and a choice of three vegetables cooked in authentic village style. A vegetarian option is also available.

This is topped with a range of desserts including traditional favorites with a modern twist. Included are ginger pudding, beli cream mousse and curd cake and treacle.

Pic by Dharmasena Welipitiya

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Christmas cake mixing by Grand Kandyan

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The grand Kandyan is getting ready for their Christmas cake with a variety of spices, essences, liquor and flavorings. before the actual baking takes place a press release said.

The release also said the hotel was adhering to the safety rules of Covid 19 and maintaining the highest level of hygiene. The staff joined the rituals of pouring and mixing ingredients with much enthusiasm and fun, looking forward to an exciting festive season.

The release also said ‘make sure you join us with your loved ones for the seasonal programmes, and take the opportunity to taste our cake’.

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