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Editorial

Malaria must not be a forgotten disease

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Today (April 25) is World Malaria Day and we are privileged to offer our readers a most thought-provoking and informative article written by Emeritus Professor Kamini Mendis of the Colombo University who has contributed enormously to fight this once deadly disease not only here in Sri Lanka but also in the wider world through her work at the World Health Organization (WHO). Today’s generation, though bothered by the mosquito menace and at risk of other mosquito-borne diseases, are barely aware of what this scourge did to this country in the earlier part of the last century when swathes of the Kelani Valley and many parts of the dry zone were wracked by what was then a deadly disease. The lives it claimed and the misery it caused is now history.

Older readers would know that the founding leaders of the Lanka Sama Samaja Party (LSSP) won the affection of tens of thousands people, particularly in the Kelani Valley, for the succour they extended to families afflicted by the disease. That was very much a factor in the blossoming of the LSSP during its early years and the popularity of its leaders. In fact, as Prime Minister Dudley Senanayake used to say at political meetings in the dry zone during his day, opponents of the colonization schemes launched in the pre and post-Independence period would say that there were mosquitoes “as big as crows” in those areas! Nevertheless, people who left overcrowded wet zone villages to pioneer, with massive government support, irrigated agriculture in the relatively unpopulated dry zone prospered. Sadly many of their descendants are today victims of the human – elephant conflict triggered by mindless deforestation of more recent years.

Prof. Mendis makes the point that while today we may be beleaguered by many health problems, not least by the covid epidemic raging globally, malaria is no more. She says that the year 2012 saw the last case of malaria transmitted by a mosquito in this country. This, as she says, is a colossal achievement by any standard and despite anxieties and worries that the disease may return, the country has been kept clear of malaria transmission for nearly nine years now. But given the fact that we thought we had defeated malaria forever when we nearly eliminated the disease as far back as 1963, “it returned with a vengeance to devastate the country for the next 50 year.” That’s a clear indication of what can happen if the guard is let down as happened in the case of leprosy. In the context of the fact that a new and highly efficient vector mosquito transmitting malaria in urban areas in India has found its way here, there’s an ever present danger of the recurrence of the disease in Sri Lanka.

It is our good fortune that this country is blessed with specialists like Professor Mendis, with both the expertise and commitment to fight the disease, as well as communication skills to effectively convey the message of the ever-present danger of a recurrence. Alongside, she has presented simple and effective ways of meeting the threat. She says in her article that if physicians seeing fever cases, probes the patient’s history and finds that he/she had recently traveled abroad, then there is good reason to test for malaria using the tools readily available today. Business travelers, pilgrims, Lankans working abroad and even returning members of the armed forces and police posted for UN Peace Keeping duties in malarious countries may well carry the infection back home, she has said. Most ‘imported’ malaria infections are acquired in neighboring India and African countries, the article says. Thus a state-of-the-art surveillance scheme must be maintained to treat infected persons without delay to ensure they would not infect the mosquitoes that are a continuing stinging and buzzing menace in this country.

Out of sight out of mind is a well-worn cliché that nevertheless retains its validity. Given mankind’s current preoccupation with the covid pandemic, other dangers that continue to lurk around us can be easily forgotten as they too often are. This country took a lot of pride in the achievement of eradicating malaria using insecticides like DDT and later malathion. Yet we permitted the disease to return largely as a result of our own negligence and lack of civic consciousness among our people who uncaringly allowed mosquito breeding places to exist without let or hindrance. Apart from abandoned gem pits in the countryside and numerous other stagnant water bodies, urban dwellers with clogged gutters and drains, carelessly strewn containers, coconut shells etc. collecting water have seemingly forever allowed the mosquito problem to grow. This is despite the many dengue scares and near epidemics that have plagued us in the recent past. But malaria, in the words of Prof. Mendis, “is a rare and forgotten disease in the country today.” Such a situation obviously must not be allowed to persist and the Anti Malaria Campaign that has done yeoman service to this country in the past must be supported as best as we can.



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Editorial

Blind faith in seers

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Thursday 11th April, 2024

Astrologers were clashing over the traditional New Year auspicious times or nekath, at the time of writing. Some of them are of the view that the nekath prepared by what is described as the State Astrologers’ Committee of the Department of Cultural Affairs will have malefic effects on the country. However, Minister of Buddha Sasana, and Religious and Cultural Affairs Vudura Wickremanayake has ceremonially handed over the nekath seettuwa or the table of auspicious time to President Ranil Wickremesinghe.

Everything is done in an astrologically-prescribed manner in this country. In fact, astrologers are the real eminences grises; they have politicians, including government leaders, eating out of their hand. It is they who decide when elections should be held, the only exception being the presidential polls during the tenure of a President elected by Parliament. There have been instances where they had Presidents advance presidential elections. Most citizens are also believers in astrology, which influences their lives from the cradle to the grave. If it is true that benefits accrue from auspicious times to those who observe them, how can one explain Sri Lanka’s current predicament? Why has the country had to beg for dollars and plead with its creditors to reschedule its debts in spite of following astrological guidelines to the letter?

There is no way Sri Lanka can come out of the current economic crisis without enhancing national productivity, which is the be-all and end-all of economic progress, and this is a task that requires hard work, longer working hours, and, above all, a radical attitudinal change. Everyone has to move out of his or her comfort zone and work harder if he or she is to help the country achieve economic progress. A prerequisite for realising this ambitious goal is to stop blaming others and planets and stars, and act responsibly while seeking guidance from real experts, and not self-proclaimed seers who are a dime a dozen.

The rice trick

Sri Lankan politicians do a Santa during election years. They throw public funds around generously as if they were spending their own money. They have mastered the art of bribing Citizen Perera with his own money and cheating him out of his vote. This has been going on for more than seven decades.

The SLPP-UNP government has allocated funds with a generous hand for poor relief in this election year. It has undertaken to distribute free rice among the needy families during the current festive season.

The rice trick has worked since Independence. In 1953, Prime Minister Dudley Senanayake had to resign amidst a mass uprising triggered by an increase in the price of a measure of rice, among other things. His successor, Sir John Kotelawala, had to restore the rice subsidy partially to bring the situation under control. Sirimavo Bandaranaike also played the rice trick to win elections. She promised what has come to be dubbed ‘rice from the moon’; she promised that rice would be made available even if it had to be brought from the moon, but later she imposed restrictions on the consumption and transport of rice.

In the run-up to the 1977 general election, J. R. Jayewardene promised eight pounds of cereal or eta raththal atak per week to alleviate poverty under a UNP government. His pledges were like pie crust made to be broken, and the people got nothing by way of free cereal. Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga undertook to lower the bread prices, and did not care to make good on her promise. President Mahinda Rajapaksa turned Temple Trees into a dansela of sorts by giving away food, especially on days of religious significance. His gastronomic bribes yielded the desired results, and he managed to win elections until his overconfidence overtook him.

The incumbent government, which has ruined the economy and inflicted unprecedented suffering on the public, is playing the rice trick in a bid to assuage public anger ahead of elections. But the poor do not live by rice alone, and they eat rice throughout the year, and not just during festive seasons. The vast majority of people who are struggling to dull the pangs of hunger will not get free rice even as a temporary measure. There’s the rub for the government.

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Editorial

Blues red in tooth and claw

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Wednesday 10th April, 2024

The latest internecine battle of the Blues, as it were, at Darley Road, has taken a dramatic turn. The anti-Sirisena faction of the SLFP held a politburo meeting, on Monday, and made some key appointments. They met at the Sri Lanka Foundation Institute because the SLFP headquarters at Darley Road, Colombo 10 remained closed. Former President Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, who is leading the battle against former President Maithripala Sirisena, was present there, as an ‘observer’, enjoying the drama directed by her.

The SLFP politburo members who were present at Monday’s meeting appointed Senior Vice President of the SLFP, Nimal Siripala de Silva, as the party’s Acting Chairman. That is the way, they seem to think, they can save the SLFP from Sirisena, but what they have chosen to do is like handing over a lamb to a tiger to save it from a wolf!

The Sirisena faction insists that Monday’s meeting convened by Senior Vice President de Silva was illegal. It maintains that the party Constitution does not provide for such gatherings and appointments. The SLFP is likely to be embroiled in another legal battle in this election year, when it has to remain maniacally focussed on strategising for the upcoming polls.

When SLFP National Organiser, Duminda Dissanayake, was asked in a television interview on Monday night whether he thought it was proper to have convened a politburo meeting without the party Chairman, he answered in the affirmative. He argued that circumstances had warranted such action; he asked rhetorically what the party was supposed to do in the event of the demise of its Chairman. But the SLFP Chairman is alive and still going strong despite an interim injunction barring him from functioning in that position temporarily. Have his rivals left him for politically dead?

The SLFP chairmanship is a straw Sirisena is clutching at to remain relevant in national politics, and he is not likely to let go of it without a fight. Yesterday, his loyalists went to the SLFP headquarters, and made a futile attempt to have the police open its main gate, which has remained locked for several days. They returned tit for tat; they padlocked the gate before leaving the place.

Now, neither faction of the SLFP can enter the party headquarters unless an amicable settlement is reached or the gate is forced open. Thus, the SLFP has shot itself in the foot while the SJB, the UNP and the JVP-led NPP are busy with their presidential election campaigns.

Those who claim to be on a mission to save the SLFP from each other have become its worst enemies; they are trying to settle personal scores and further self-interest at the expense of it. They are red in tooth and claw, and it will be a miracle if the SLFP succeeds in turning itself around in the foreseeable future.

Sirisena has flown to Bangkok, of all places, while the battle for the SLFP leadership is raging. Sri Lankan politicians’ wanderlust is notoriously insatiable. Not even devastating terror attacks prevented some Presidents from going on foreign junkets during the war. In 2019, Sirisena, who was the then President, Defence Minister and Commander-in-Chief, was overseas at the time of the Easter Sunday terror strikes although the defence authorities had been warned of the impending terrorist attacks. Old habits are said to die hard.

Chandrika has said she came under pressure from those who detested the Mahinda Rajapaksa government to run for President, again, in 2015, but she had Sirisena fielded as the presidential candidate instead; she now regrets having done so. Thankfully, she did not contest, but unfortunately Sirisena did. A third term for President Rajapaksa would have been equally disastrous. Chandrika will have her work cut out to convince the public that she is not making a fatal mistake again by siding with another bunch of failed politicians bent on grabbing the reins of the SLFP.

It looks as if the SLFP had to be saved from its self-proclaimed saviours.

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Editorial

Presidential race and horse-trading

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Tuesday 9th April, 2024

Former local government members of the SLPP have decided to back Ranil Wickremesinghe in the upcoming presidential election, according to media reports. These politicians have remained loyal to the Rajapaksa family through thick and thin, and their support is the be-all and end-all of the SLPP’s political survival. They would not have pledged their support for Wickremesinghe without Basil Rajapaksa’s blessings.

What one gathers from the decision of the ex-local councillors of the SLPP to throw in their lot with Wickremesinghe is that the SLPP will not field a presidential candidate. Some of these politicians are likely to join the UNP. The SLPP, which scored three stunning electoral victories consecutively in 2018, 2019 and 2020 has ruined things for itself in such a way that it cannot even contest an election at present!

The SLPP, which came into being as a party of the Rajapaksas by the Rajapaksas for the Rajapaksas, is now in total disarray. Basil, came back from the US last month in a bid to sort it out, but it is like ‘a bunch of areca nuts dashed on the ground’, as a local saying goes. About two dozen SLPP MPs, including dissidents, and countless SLPP supporters, have switched their allegiance to the UNP and the SJB. The Rajapaksas have lost control of a sizeable section of the remaining SLPP Parliamentary group. Otherwise, they would have caused a general election to precede the next presidential election, by having a parliamentary resolution passed to compel President Ranil Wickremesinghe to dissolve Parliament forthwith. The SLPP is desperate to face a general election first and try to retain as many parliamentary seats as possible before its electoral weakness is exposed in the next presidential election.

The former local councillors of the SLPP may be able to deliver some votes to the presidential candidate of their choice, but their support could prove counterproductive in that they are considered the shock troops of the Rajapaksas. They were the ones who carried out an unprovoked, savage attack on the Aragalaya protesters at Galle Face on 09 May, 2022, triggering a tsunami of retaliatory violence, which marked the beginning of the end of the Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s presidency. The public detests such corrupt, violent elements, and that is why the government has postponed local government polls. The support of such characters is likely to be the kiss of death for Wickremesinghe. But the UNP is still lying supine and most of its seniors are political liabilities and therefore Wickremesinghe, who is desperate for support in the presidential race, would not mind being ‘kissed’ by anyone.

There is said to be no such thing as a free lunch, and the SLPP’s local government politicians would not have offered to support Wickremesinghe in the presidential race for nothing. The Rajapaksas are notorious for demanding ‘something’ for doing anything. So, what will the SLPP expect in return for backing Wickremesinghe? Will it be a general election to be held on the same day as the next presidential contest, or the post of premiership for a member of the Rajapaska family in the event of Wickremesinghe securing the presidency and steering a coalition led by the UNP to victory at the next parliamentary election? Whatever the conditions for the SLPP’s support for Wickremesinghe may be, with the likes of SLPP leaders as allies, Wickremesinghe needs no enemies.

If the SLPP skips the next presidential election and backs Wickremesinghe, it will take many years to regain lost ground, much less groom a member of the Rajapaksa family for a presidential contest again. Its support base will also suffer a severe erosion. Some SLPP MPs loyal to the Rajapaksa family have embarked on a campaign to promote Namal Rajapaksa as the next leader of their party. But he will have to wait for years, if not decades, until the people have forgotten what the Rajapaksas have done to the country, to make a comeback like ‘Bongbong’ Marcos of the Philippines.

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