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Editorial

‘Sporting Spirit’

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Tuesday 13th July, 2021

The Euro Cup final must have brightened up the day for the pandemic-hit world on Sunday. It was a thriller from the word go. Barely three minutes into the match, England stunned the unbeaten Italians with a volley into the net. The visitors, on a 34-match winning streak, did not know what hit them. Perhaps, it was the first unnerving shock they had suffered since September 2018. Euphoria erupted in the stands with electrifying chants from the English fans while the Italian supporters were holding their heads in dismay. The Italians fought back courageously. The big break for them came in the 66th minute, when an equaliser was sunk into the net. It was a real game changer.

Both sides amply proved their prowess, and the game went down to the wire, as expected. The extra time sans any result gave way to a penalty shootout. Lady luck smiled on the Italians, who partied till morn. Thus, ended a superb game of football, and it was heartening to hear the Wembley roar again after a lapse of so many moons although the sprawling stadium was not packed to the rafters for health reasons.

The need for entertaining sports events in these troubled times to enliven the hapless humans across the globe cannot be overemphasised. All those who made the Euro Cup tournament a huge success deserve praise for having made life somewhat tolerable for fellow humans the world over.

Let’s now look at the ugly side of the night of fun. What followed after Sunday’s match, while crowds were pouring out of the majestic stadium, reminded us of the Orwellian description of ‘sporting spirit’. Some English fans set upon their Italian counterparts, who were in seventh heaven. One cannot but agree with George Orwell, who wrote in his famous essay, The Sporting Spirit, ‘international sporting contests lead to orgies of hatred’.

Commenting on the animosity that several football matches a visiting Russian team played with some British teams, in 1945, had generated, Orwell had this to say in his essay: “If you wanted to add to the vast fund of ill-will existing in the world at this moment, you could hardly do it better than by a series of football matches between Jews and Arabs, Germans and Czechs, Indians and British, Russians and Poles, and Italians and Jugoslavs, each match to be watched by a mixed audience of 100,000 spectators ….” How true!

As if the rowdy scenes some shameless English fans created were not enough, the three English players who missed penalties became targets of racist abuse on social media. The English Football Association lost no time in condemning the dastardly attacks and calling for action against those responsible.

Some of the uncivilised elements in the garb of sports fans responsible for the racist attacks at issue may have been disappointed punters who had pinned all their hopes on the English team. But these unfortunate situations come about mainly because nationalism is mixed with the sporting spirit. When this happens, otherwise enjoyable sporting events come to be viewed by some rabid elements as wars that must be won by hook or by crook. Unable to stomach defeat, these characters turn abusive and even violent.

During the semifinal match between England and Denmark, a section of the English fans made the world wonder whether they were civilised enough to be at a sporting event; they booed while the Danish national anthem was being played. (There was a repeat performance on Sunday.) It was a controversial penalty that enabled England to beat Denmark and make it to the final.

Sports fans ought to realise that there are much worse things in life than having to witness the defeats of their national players in international competitions.

Interestingly, the UK promoted the tournament with the much-publicised slogan that the Cup was coming home. Instead, it went to Rome!



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Editorial

A rotting fish head

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Wednesday 4th August, 2021

 

What is this world coming to when female legislators complain of sexual harassment in Parliament itself? SJB MP Rohini Wijeratne yesterday complained to Speaker Mahinda Yapa Abeywardena that SJB MP Thalatha Athukorale had suffered verbal sexual abuse at the hands of some government MPs during the recent debate on the no-faith motion against Minister Udaya Gammanpila. She alleged that the Chair had done nothing to rein in the unruly SLPP MPs, who went scot-free. It was Parliament’s moment of shame.

Speaker Abeywardene later told the House there was no truth in MP Wijeratne’s claim, but the SJB insists that the incident happened, and a probe must be conducted.

A few years ago, the media revealed that some male MPs were sexually harassing their female counterparts. The then Speaker Karu Jayasuriya promised action and asked for formal complaints, but nobody came forward, and the issue fizzled out. The victims obviously chose to remain silent for fear of reprisal and stigma.

Allegations of verbal sexual harassment are not limited to Parliament. The local government institutions have their share of frustrated males notorious for insulting and/or even making advances to female councillors; they cannot utter a single sentence devoid of smutty double entendre.

We reported, on 18 Jan. 2021, that female local government members were denied their right to speak at council meetings, dominated by unruly males. Maharagama Urban Council member (SLFP) Chandrika de Zoysa was quoted as having said, at a press conference organised by a collective of female councillors, that their male counterparts heckled them and even shouted them down whenever they tried to speak. A similar situation prevailed at all other councils, the female councillors said. We editorially commented on the predicament of women, and called for action against the misogynists. Some women’s rights groups took up the issue, but the problem persists, we are told. How can we get rid of the scourge of gender-based discrimination against women when the so-called people’s representatives themselves promote it with impunity?

The SJB-led Opposition should ensure that action is taken against the bad eggs in the garb of government MPs who made lewd, demeaning comments on Thalatha, who is a former Minister of Justice. The members of the Women Parliamentarians’ Caucus, whose mission is to empower women and eliminate violence and harassment against them, must circle their wagons, and protest until a probe is ordered.

The Opposition must name the SLPP MPs who harassed Thalatha so that the public will know who these sick characters are, and action can be taken against them. It should also explore the possibility of moving a no-faith motion against these shameless elements, and making the House discuss the issue of gender-based discrimination against its own members and adopt measures to solve the problem once and for all. The Opposition holds protests over numerous issues, but is silent on the sexual harassment of one of its female members.

All political parties have women’s wings, which must take up the issue of discrimination and sexual harassment female representatives undergo in political institutions.

Women account for more than one half of Sri Lanka’s population, but there are only 12 female MPs. The number of women legislators should be increased. Women must push for this. This is something the Parliamentary Select Committee, tasked with identifying ‘appropriate reforms of the election laws and the electoral system’ and recommending ‘necessary amendments’, should give serious thought to.

We are not short of male MPs who pretend to be paragons of virtue and pontificate to others. We hear them urging the protesting teachers to behave. Shouldn’t they put their own house in order before faulting others for indiscipline? A fish, as we keep saying, is said to rot from the head down.

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Editorial

Friends of the virus

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Tuesday, 3rd August, 2021

Coronavirus is an elusive enemy, and it is a mistake to declare victory prematurely in a country’s war against it. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his New Zealand counterpart Jacinda Arden performed the hongi, a few weeks ago, presumably in a bid to show the world that their countries were safe. But, today, the virus is troubling Australia, again. Brisbane and Gold Coast have been locked down, and the army is patrolling Sydney to ensure that travel restrictions are fully enforced. The US also made the mistake of lowering its guard after a successful vaccination campaign. It now has a resurgence of coronavirus to contend with; the daily infection rate is expected to reach 300,000 soon. The Delta variant has also caused China’s Covid-19 defences to collapse with a surge in infections even in cities declared coronavirus-free. Japan has extended the state of emergency to more areas. This is what the Delta variant is capable of.

It is against this backdrop that the Sri Lankan government’s decision to make all state employees report for work with effect from yesterday should be viewed. When all public sector employees start going to work, buses and trains will be chock-a-block, and the transmission of coronavirus will receive a turbo boost.

True, the country cannot afford to remain closed indefinitely, and it has to be reopened to revive its ailing economy. But caution should be exercised when restrictions are removed. It would have been prudent for the government to stagger the reopening of public institutions. The state sector, which is terribly overstaffed, may be able to maintain its performance at a reasonable level with about one half of its workforce. Some processes in the public sector can be streamlined technologically to make them less labour intensive.

The government says that most of the state employees have been vaccinated against Covid-19, and are therefore safe, but the fact remains that breakthrough infections are on the rise, and the vaccinated people could also transmit the virus, albeit at a lower rate.

Chances are that the ongoing protests by teachers will not be over anytime soon. Infections could fan out through protesting teachers, most of whom are said to be fully vaccinated. When teachers return home after taking part in protests, they may infect their families and friends. It took only a single infected cook to land a whole village in the soup, the other day, in the Kalutara district. Nearly 90 persons contracted Covid-19 thanks to him, according to media reports.

The government deserves praise for its hitherto successful vaccination programme, but unfortunately it is driving trade unions to launch street protests and thereby boost the transmission of the Delta variant. It has got its priorities all mixed up. What possessed it to present the Kotelawala National Defence University (KNDU) bill amidst an unprecedented national health emergency, and provoke other stakeholders into taking to the streets?

The focus of the government and the Opposition should be on beating the virus and reviving the economy. Even the existing national universities lack resources and are struggling to maintain standards. They remain closed due to the pandemic. It defies comprehension why on earth the government is in a mighty hurry to upgrade the defence university at this juncture.

The government should seriously consider putting the KNDU bill on hold, and the protesting teachers ought to stop street demonstrations and opt for talks with the government to have their salary issues sorted out. Unless the spread of the Delta variant is stopped forthwith, the country will have to be closed again. The economy, which is already on oxygen support, will not survive another round of lockdowns; the government will be left without any funds for any university, and the protesting teachers will not receive even their salaries. All workers including those in the private sector and their families will have to starve in such an eventuality. This is the danger that the government and the protesters are exposing the country to. They are the friends of the virus.

 

 

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Editorial

Of that monkey motion

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Monday 2nd August, 2021

A government MP has submitted a private member’s motion seeking parliamentary approval for capturing and sterilising monkeys. He wants these animals relocated to vegetated islands in reservoirs, etc., thereafter. Monkeys cause considerable crop damage, and farmers are desperate to hold them at bay. Various methods have been employed over the years to prevent troops of monkeys from invading villages, and even terrorising people, especially women and children. So, the government MP concerned may have been prompted to come up with the aforesaid plan to solve the problem in response to requests from his constituents, but he does not seem to have obtained expert opinion on the issue.

How to catch so many monkeys has not been specified in the motion, the full text of which we published on Saturday, and it will be an intractable problem unless the government assigns the task to the idling local government members, who are too numerous to be counted.

The motion at issue reminds us of a proposal made by a deputy minister in the yahapalana government. He wanted an open season declared on wild pigs and monkeys, and some of the wild elephants shipped to other countries as gifts. He said the populations of some wild animals had increased exponentially, causing problems to humans, and culling was the solution. The wild boar could be killed and sold for meat, he maintained. His proposal struck a responsive chord with some of the people troubled by wild animals, but drew a lot of criticism from others, especially animal rights activists. He chose to ignore the root cause of the problem—the huge increase in the human population, which has led to the opening up of the natural habitats of animals for cultivation and development purposes. It is not only humans who need lebensraum, or the territory needed for their natural development; animals also do. When space, food and water become scarce, animals invade villages.

The main reason for the human-elephant conflict is that many villages and farmlands have sprung up, unplanned, in the middle of animal territories, causing the depletion of forest cover, and in some cases, even blocking elephant corridors. The methods being used at present to tackle the conflict are outdated, and remedial action proposed by experts such as Dr. Prithiviraj Fernando has gone unheeded. Successive governments have been only throwing money at the problem, as we reported on 22 July.

There are other reasons for wild animal invasions. Dr. Nishan Sakalasooriya of the University of Kelaniya has, in a research paper presented at an international conference in 2019, pointed out that the prolonged neglect of forest tanks or kuluwew built for special purposes such as storing rainwater, enriching groundwater level, providing water for wild animals, maintaining the food chain, etc., has caused the problem of wild elephants, monkeys, porcupines, giant squirrels and wild boar invading village ecosystems and threatening the settlers in an unprecedented manner. Insects, rats and snakes also enter residential and farming areas as a result, he has said, concluding that if the kuluwew are renovated systematically and forest ecosystems restored, the wild animal threat can be reduced by about 80 percent. This is something President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, who has evinced a keen interest in rural development, should give serious thought to.

Meanwhile, it may not be too cynical a view that perhaps the SLPP politicians will not have to run around sterilising monkeys unless their supporters who are encroaching on forest lands apace are reined in; at the rate forest clearance is being carried out, the day may not be far off when we are left with no trees and no wild animals.

As for the aforesaid private member’s motion, a wag says he does not think the translocation of monkeys to islands in reservoirs or rivers will be a solution, if experience is anything to go by; the aggressive anthropoids we send to an ait in a lake near the Colombo city every five years or so do not cease to be a nuisance. They, in fact, become a bigger problem after being sent there, and destroy forests, etc. These troublesome creatures in kapati suit are far more invasive and destructive than the brachiating primates that only seek to satisfy their needs and not unlimited wants. If the main remedy that the monkey motion proposes—sterilisation—had been adopted in dealing with the anthropoids that people sent to the lake isle close to Colombo years ago, the country would have been free from trouble currently being caused by their descendants.

One only hopes the motion in question will prompt the government to ponder the problems that wild animals cause to humans, and vice versa, and enlist the support of experts to solve them, without further delay.

 

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