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Public Security Minister: Prosecuting terror suspects laborious task, but process moving faster than in advanced countries

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Public Security Minister Rear Admiral (retd.) Sarath Weerasekera at the opening of the new police station at Malabe yesterday

Public Security Minister Rear Admiral (retd.) Sarath Weerasekera yesterday said that it had taken the US 20 years to commence the legal process against the mastermind of Sept 11 attacks, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and France seven years to prosecute the mastermind of the November 2015 Paris attacks.

“We started the prosecution of the mastermind of the Easter Sunday attacks within two and a half years. Almost all that has to be done by the police have been completed. Yet, with regard to some individuals, investigations are in progress,” the Minister said speaking to journalists after declaring open the new police station at Malabe.

Weerasekera said Colombo Archbishop Malcolm Cardinal Ranjith had made several statements and expressed his dissatisfaction over the pace of the prosecution process. “We have to accept his criticism because he is the one who represents the Catholic people, who has been immensely affected by the Easter Sunday terror attacks. The process is progressing and we cannot influence the legal process. But when compared to situations with regard to similar incidents in other countries we have done much better,” the Minister said.

“As of now cases are being heard in five High Courts against 32 persons involved in the Easter Sunday attacks. Among them are 24 main suspects including Naufer Moulavi and Jafoor Mama. The case is being heard in an expeditious manner at the request of the Attorney General, the Chief Justice appointed a special Trial-at-Bar to accelerate the process. The case is to be heard continuously, starting from this month.

“I think that we must be appreciative of the services rendered by the investigators to complete such a heavy load of work within two and a half years. The CID probed around 112,000 telephone calls. They have filed 23,700 charges. In addition, there are four reports in this regard; namely the reports by the Parliamentary Select Committee, Parliament Sectoral Oversight Committee, and the Presidential Commision of Inquiry. The Attorney General has to study them all to make sure that there would not be any discrepancy in testimonies otherwise the accused would avail themselves the advantage of such differences and win the case against them. It may take some time but I assure you that those responsible would not go Scott-free.”

Among those present were IGP CD Wickramaratne and Western Province Senior DIG Deshabandu Tennakoon.



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Keheliya turns down request for abolishing price control on medicine

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Industry leader has sought court intervention

By Shamindra Ferdinando

Health Minister Keheliya Rambukwella yesterday (17) said that in spite of difficulties caused by the foreign currency crisis price control on imported medicines couldn’t be done away with.

Abolition of price control on drugs would heap an enormous burden on the vast majority of people, Minister Rambukwella said.

Lawmaker Rambukwella said so when The Island sought his response to the Sri Lanka Chamber of the Pharmaceutical Industry (SLCPI) requesting the government to do away with price control. Claiming that the grouping imported over 80 percent of medicines into the country, the SLCPI recently warned of possible collapse of the industry unless remedial measures were taken swiftly.

Minister Rambukwella said that recently he met an SLCPI delegation at their request to discuss issues at hand. “Of course, I understand the difficulties experienced by all sectors, including the pharmaceutical trade. However, price control as regards medicine cannot be done away with,” Minister Rambukwella said.

The SLCPI has pointed out to the Minister that at the moment medicines were the only commodity under price control in the local market. The Health Minister asserted that it wouldn’t be fair to compare the medicine with other commodities.

Minister Rambukwella said that regardless of constrains, the government was trying to ensure uninterrupted supply of medicine and it wouldn’t be fair to do at this juncture.

In a statement sent to the media SLCPI asserted: “There is no solution to this dilemma than removing the price control of medicines and implement a fair and equitable pricing mechanism which will link the price of medicines to the dollar, inflation and direct costs such as raw material, fuel and freight charges, which will then make importing and marketing of medicines viable. As difficult as it may sound, the authorities will have to choose between having medicines at a cost and not having medicines at all.”

The SLCPI has already sought the intervention of the courts to establish what the grouping called a transparent pricing mechanism outside government price control.

Recently, Minister Rambukwella, at a meeting also attended by State Minister Dr. Channa Jayasumana called for a report on the requirement of medicines over the next six months. The Health Ministry declared that there was no shortage of drugs whereas SLCPI claimed some drugs were in short supply and the situation could get worse.

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Central Expressway: Rs 3 mn raked in within 12 hours

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Chief Government Whip and Highways Minister Johnston Fernando said yesterday that about three million rupees had been earned by way of toll within the first 12 hours of the opening of the second phase of the Central Expressway.

Rs 2,805,100.00 had been paid by the expressway users during the first 12 hours from 12 noon to midnight Sunday (16) after its opening by the President and the Prime Minister on Saturday (15).

The Minister said that during the first 12 hours of the period of toll collection, a total of 13,583 vehicles had traversed the most  scenic road stretch in the country between Mirigama and Kurunegala. No traffic accidents had been reported during the 12 hour period.

Minister Fernando said that the newly opened road had been allowed to be used by the public free of charge for 12 hours from midnight Saturday (15) to Sunday (16) noon.

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President to inaugurate second session of Ninth Parliament today

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by Saman Indrajith

President Gotabaya Rajapaksa is scheduled to commence the second session of the Ninth Parliament today at 10 am with his third Presidential policy statement (formerly Throne Speech).

He made his first ‘Throne Speech’ on Jan 3, 2020, opening the Fourth Session of the Eighth Parliament and the second on Aug 20, 2020 to open the First Session of the Ninth Parliament.

Secretary General of Parliament, Dhammika Dasanayake said that MPs have been requested to arrive at the parliamentary complex at 9.25 am the latest.

The MPs, if accompanied by their spouses will alight from their vehicles at the Staff Entrance of the parliamentary building, while all other MPs are requested to drive up to the Members’ Entrance.

To facilitate orderly arrival, the MPs are requested that the Car Label provided them with be pasted on the inside top left-hand corner of the windscreen of their vehicles. On arrival at Parliament, Members’ vehicles would be directed by the Police to the appropriate Car Park.

Thereafter the MPs are requested to enter the lobbies of Parliament and to remain there until the Quorum Bells are rung.

President Rajapaksa is scheduled to arrive at the Main Steps of the Parliament Building at 9.40 a.m. and he would be received by Speaker Mahinda Yapa Abeywardena and the Secretary-General of Parliament.

The President will be escorted by them to the Parliament Building. Thereafter, the Speaker and the Secretary-General of Parliament will escort the President to his Chambers.

At 9.55 a.m. the Quorum Bells will be rung for five minutes and all Members will take their seats in the Chamber of Parliament.

The President’s procession will leave for the Chamber of Parliament and will enter the Chamber at 10.00 am. On entering the Chamber the President’s arrival will be announced whereupon all Members will stand in their places until the President reaches the Chair and requests the Members to be seated.

Thereafter, the Proclamation proroguing the Parliament and Summoning the Meeting of Parliament will be read by the Secretary General of Parliament. Then, the President will address Parliament.

After his policy statement the President will adjourn the House until 1.00 p.m. on Wednesday (19).

Thereafter, the President will leave the Chamber escorted by the Speaker and the Secretary-General of Parliament.

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