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Editorial

Death could be Black and White

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Saturday 22nd May, 2021

It never rains, but it pours. While the Covid-19 pandemic is spreading fast and carrying off several thousands of people daily, the cyclone season has turned extremely active in India, which has had its fair share of crises. Natural disasters will worsen the prevailing health crisis. Sri Lanka is also likely to find itself in a similar predicament in case of floods and other such natural disasters due to torrential rains. As if the pandemic and cyclones were not enough, India now has two other problems to contend with—the black fungus and the white fungus.

Mucormycosis cases are said to be on the rise among those who recover from Covid-19; this disease caused by the black fungus is said to have a 50% mortality rate, and some victims have to undergo lifesaving surgeries to have their eyes and jawbones removed. The situation is so bad that, on Thursday, Indian Health Ministry Joint Secretary Lav Agaarwal urged about 30 states to declare the disease an epidemic. It behoves other countries to closely watch the situation in India and draw lessons.

What actually causes mucormycosis in Covid-19 patients has not been determined, but doctors believe it could be linked to the use of steroids to treat severe cases, especially diabetics, according to media reports. The suspected link between the exponential growth of the black fungus and the Covid-19 drug regimen is bound to make the fight against the pandemic even more difficult.

Indian doctors have found that the white fungus infection is deadlier than the one caused by the black fungus; it spreads much faster and affects lungs, kidneys, intestines, stomach and the reproductive system, the Indian media has reported, quoting medical experts. Patients put on steroids and high oxygen support are found to be affected by the white fungus. This has been a double whammy for the Covid-19 patients needing critical care. Confirmed white fungus cases are reportedly increasing across India, signalling the onset of another epidemic.

Unfortunately, people do not seem sufficiently aware of the danger of the black fungus and the white fungus either in India or other parts of the world, especially here. The fact that most of the Covid-19 patients recover, many of them even without realising they ever contracted it, has made Sri Lankans (as well as their counterparts elsewhere) take the pandemic for granted, as evident from their reluctance to follow the health guidelines, which many of them consider a nuisance. The police and the Public Health Inspectors are, therefore, having a hard time, trying to make people wear masks and practise physical distancing.

In enforcing compliance with the pandemic preventive measures, fear is the key. It is not the fear of punishment as such but the fear of the worst-case scenario—a painful death. The public must be made to realise that all is not well after recovery from Covid-19, and they run the risk of losing their dear lives or precious eyes and jawbones afterwards. Even if the elusive coronavirus spares them, either the black fungus or the white fungus is likely to get them. This harsh reality must be drilled into the heads of those who take Covid-19 lightly if they are to realise the need to co-operate with the health authorities and adopt preventive measures.

Meanwhile, it is hoped that the Sri Lankan health authorities, and their political bosses who think no end of themselves will take serious notice of the deadly fungal infections that come in the wake of Covid-19 recoveries in India, and adopt precautions to avert disaster. Let them be urged not to let the grass grow under their feet, and pin the blame on the public, the way they did as regards the current wave of infections they brought about by playing politics with pandemic preventive measures during recent festive season.

 

 



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Editorial

Failures galore

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Saturday 12th June, 2021

The Covid-19 fatality rate is rising steadily; 101 deaths were reported yesterday. A few weeks ago, not many people may have taken seriously scientists’ prediction that Covid deaths would exceed 100 a day here unless stringent measures were adopted to curb the spread of the pandemic. The government played politics with pandemic control in April and let the grass grow under its feet, and the public took health experts’ warnings lightly, and threw caution to the wind.

It is usually the ruling party/coalition that faces internal problems during national crises, which the Opposition uses to gain traction on the political front. But, today, both the government and the Opposition are up the creek; the former has its approval ratings plummeting rapidly due to the mismanagement of the pandemic, corruption, inefficiency, etc., and the latter is facing a leadership crisis. They are papering over the cracks.

The Opposition would have the public believe that President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has failed. Its propagandists have launched an aggressive social media campaign against the government, which, they claim, has failed on every front. If their claim is considered true, then it follows therefrom that 6.9 million people who voted for Rajapaksa at the last presidential election have failed, for they have made a bad choice. The same may be said of those who voted for the SLPP at the last general election.

Some key Opposition figures in the SJB have reportedly turned against their leader Sajith Premadasa, and are expected to join forces with UNP leader Ranil Wickremesinghe when the latter enters Parliament as a UNP National List MP. The SJB rebels are of the view that the Opposition, under Premadasa’s leadership, has failed to live up to the people’s expectations because it has not become an effective countervailing force against the government, which is bulldozing its way through. One may therefore argue that 5.5 million people who voted for Premadasa at the last presidential election have also failed; the same goes for the voters who backed the SJB at last year’s parliamentary polls.

Thus, it may be seen that not only the elected but also electors have failed. This may explain why this country finds itself in the present predicament and is unable to achieve progress.

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Let actions speak!

Some Opposition MPs refused to be inoculated against Covid-19, declaring that they would wait until the ordinary public had been vaccinated; a few of these politicians have contracted the disease. Opposition Leader Sajith Premadasa is one of them. Attending a religious function at Ganagaramaya, Colombo, after being discharged from hospital, Premadasa said he had got infected because he had refused the jab for the sake of the public. He deserves praise for having taken a principled position.

Undergoing quarantine or treatment for Covid-19 at private hospitals is a luxury that ordinary people cannot afford; they are taken to the state-run quarantine facilities or hospitals. Have the Opposition politicians who refused to be given first dibs on the jab, for the sake of the public, and got infected as a result, stayed at the same government quarantine centres or hospitals as the ordinary people? If not, why?

Opposition Leader Premadasa has rightly called upon the government to curtail waste and channel the funds so saved for the country’s fight against Covid-19. He has berated the government both in and outside Parliament for incurring unnecessary expenditure––quite rightly so. He has struck a responsive chord with the right-thinking people, who expect the government to manage public money frugally.

Having talked the talk so eloquently, now the Opposition Leader has got an opportunity to walk the walk. The government has unashamedly decided to buy luxury vehicles for the MPs amidst the worsening national health emergency. The Opposition MPs are among the beneficiaries of what has come to be dubbed the Covid bonanza; they also had no qualms about spending public funds to the tune of billions of rupees on importing vehicles for the MPs in the aftermath of disasters like the Meethotamulla garbage dump collapse and the Salawa armoury blast. They unflinchingly did so while the disaster victims were crying out for assistance. They have shown no remorse for their shameful actions.

Will the Opposition Leader launch a frontal attack against the government, pressuring it to stop the luxury vehicle imports, or at least tell the SJB MPs to refuse the SUVs, etc., to be imported for them?

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Editorial

Make lockdown work

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Friday 11th June, 2021

The Covid-19 fatality rate shows no signs of plateauing any time soon, much less decreasing although the current lockdown has been in force for about three weeks. It was reported yesterday that 67 deaths had occurred due to the pandemic on Wednesday—the highest ever in a single day in this country. Curiously, there have been no such exponential increases in infections if the Health Ministry statistics are anything to go by. There are two possibilities, according to health experts. Either the severity of the disease has increased, killing more people, while the rate of virus transmission actually remains at the same level, or the number of PCR tests conducted daily has been decreased. Doctors have warned the government that any reduction in PCR testing will stand in the way of assessing the pandemic situation properly and, therefore be counterproductive.

The Covid-19 deaths are officially announced in such a way that one suspects a government attempt at obfuscation. The only way the Health Ministry can allay doubts as regards the mortality rate is to announce the number of new fatalities for each day of the week separately. Gobbledygook won’t do. Every statistical lie has a short shelf life. There is no alternative to aggressive testing in the fight against Covid-19, and the government had better heed expert advice. The country is in the current mess with so many lives being lost daily, because the government ignored doctors’ call for a lockdown in April.

Lockdowns helped prevent the formation of infection clusters very effectively last year because they were coupled with a quarantine curfew. The government was blamed for overreacting then. But this time around, the lockdown has not been so effective probably because many workplaces have been allowed to function without adequate pandemic prevention measures being adopted to ensure the safety of workers.

About 92 out of 300 workers who underwent PCR testing at a private factory in the Dompe MHO area have tested positive for Covid-19, according to media reports. These infected workers must have travelled to and from work, exposing their family members, friends and others to the disease. The existence of such infection clusters may explain why the death toll from the pandemic continues to rise in spite of the current lockdown. A similar situation is said to prevail in many other workplaces, especially factories, which must be inspected regularly.

As for the spread of Covid-19, people working in cramped conditions, run the same risk as partygoers, however essential it may be to keep factories and other such workplaces open to mitigate the adverse economic impact of the lockdown. Unless urgent action is taken to prevent the transmission of the deadly virus through these places, the current lockdown is bound to fail. The health authorities will have to inspect all workplaces that remain open to see if they have become pandemic hotspots, and ensure that aggressive PRC testing is done and workers are inoculated against Covid-19 on a priority basis. The Dompe factory cluster would not have emerged if the health officials responsible for inspecting the place had done their job properly. There is no way so many workers could work while being sick, unbeknownst to their employers. Were they forced to work to meet production targets despite their sickness? An investigation is called for.

Going by the sheer number of vehicles on roads, one may wonder whether the country is under lockdown at all, or if all Sri Lankan workers are engaged in the provision of essential services. It is humanly impossible for the police to check every vehicle, and almost all drivers and riders produce letters from their employers, claiming that they have to report for work. Confusion over who should actually go to work to maintain essential services and keep the economy ticking has to be cleared to prevent many institutions from making their employees report for work unnecessarily amidst the worsening pandemic situation.

The government keeps extending lockdowns. Necessary as such action is, given the increasing death rate, it may not help curb the spread of the pandemic unless the current movement restrictions are strictly enforced. It is high time the situation was reassessed and stringent remedial action taken to make the lockdown work so that the pandemic could be brought under control for the country to be reopened soon.

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Editorial

‘Prosperity and Splendour’

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Thursday 10th June, 2021

It is now clear that the government will import hundreds of luxury vehicles, costing billions of rupees, for the MPs while the country is struggling to procure vaccines, and medical equipment to save lives, and many people are crying out for financial assistance. How the hapless masses feel when their well-fed, contented representatives zip past them in flashy vehicles is anybody’s guess.

The government continues to contradict itself. A few weeks ago, it said it had decided against importing luxury vehicles at the instance of Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa, who is also the Minister of Finance. Previously, it said it had been left with no alternative but to impose import restrictions because foreign reserves had to be shored up. But it does not give a tinker’s cuss about the country’s foreign exchange woes when the beneficiaries of luxury imports happen to be influential politicians. It has fulfilled its prosperity-and-splendour promise, where the MPs are concerned.

Yesterday, our main news item quoted Media Minister and Government Spokesman Keheliya Rambukwella, as having said in a television interview that now it was not possible to cancel the controversial vehicle imports as letters of credit had already been opened. It is doubtful whether anyone will buy into this claim. No sooner had this government been formed than it cancelled a Japanese-funded Light Rail Transit project worth USD 2.2 billion regardless of the consequences of its action. So, the argument that it is now too late to cancel the luxury vehicle purchases does not hold water. Will the government explain why it ever decided to spend about Rs. 4 billion on vehicle imports unnecessarily amidst the raging pandemic, in the first place?

Strangely, the Opposition, which picks holes in everything the government does, and demands that wasteful expenditure be curtailed and more funds allocated for the country’s fight against the pandemic, is silent on the vehicle imports. Some of its members recently claimed they were not aware of the government decision to import luxury SUVs for the MPs! But they claim to be privy to even what the government politicians do on the sly.

Now that the patriotic members of the Opposition have been informed that the cash-strapped government is wasting public funds on importing vehicles for the MPs, what will be their reaction? Will they refuse to accept the vehicles to be imported? It may be recalled that they refused to be inoculated against Covid-19, saying the people should be given the jab first. When they said so, we asked them whether they would forgo duty free vehicles as well. Let that question be repeated.

It will be interesting to see the reaction of the Opposition, especially the SJB and the JVP. Will they call upon the government to cancel luxury vehicle imports? After all, during the yahapalana government, they even cancelled an aircraft purchase agreement. So, they should be able to pressure the government to stop importing vehicles, and if their call goes unheeded, they must say no to the SUVs, etc., being imported for them. The time has come for them to prove their claim that they really feel for the public unlike the government.

Meanwhile, the political leaders who bellow patriotic rhetoric, claiming to have made a tremendous contribution to what they call the development of the country, unashamedly beg for assistance whenever they meet foreign leaders or envoys. They also puff out their chests and beam from ear to ear when they pose for pictures with the donors handing over aid.

Begging has evolved into an industry of sorts in this country. Some shameless racketeers exploit poor children and adults with various disabilities and diseases to move the public to donate money, which they use to feather their own nests. They have amassed enormous amounts of wealth at the expense of the poor. One does not see any difference between these beggar mudalalis and the politicians who exploit the suffering of the poor to raise funds.

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