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Stirling-Balbirnie duet powers Ireland to memorable win

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In a match full of sharp twists and turns, Paul Stirling (142) and Andrew Balbirnie (113) composed game-changing hundreds to script a memorable seven-wicket victory for Ireland over the current 50-over World Champions, England. The visitors chased down the target of 329 in the final over to grab 10 crucial points in the Cricket World Cup Super League.

When Balbirnie was dismissed in the 45th over off Adil Rashid, the match was in the balance. However, the duo of Kevin O’Brien and Harry Tector played with a calm head on their shoulders to take the side home.

One of the crucial turning points in the game came in the 46th over when David Willey tried to nail the yorker, but it turned out to be a full toss, with O’Brien depositing it over the midwicket fence. To make matters worse for the hosts, it turned out to be a no-ball, as it was delivered above waist height.

O’Brien also sliced one over the in-field on the off-side in the 48th over, as the equation came down to 17 off two overs. Tector, the junior partner, followed in O’Brien’s footsteps by carving Tom Curran through the point region. O’Brien, who helped Ireland chart a famous victory in the 2011 World Cup game against England, then hit the winning runs off Saqib Mahmood.

The foundation for Ireland’s win was laid down by the duo of Stirling and Balbirnie, with the pair sharing an alliance of 214 for the second wicket. Stirling, who opened the innings with Gareth Delany, showed his aggressive intent when he slammed a couple of sixes off Saqib in the eighth over.

Despite losing his partner, Delany, he continued to play with freedom and got the required support from Balbirnie. The highlight of his innings was the way he kept tonking Rashid over the leg-side boundary for sixes. He even got down on his knee and smashed Willey for a six over midwicket.

Eventually, Stirling was run out on the back of a direct-hit by Curran. Balbirnie, who accumulated his fifth ODI hundred, soon followed him back to the pavilion. At that stage, England seemed to have made a comeback, but O’Brien and Tector had other ideas. Meanwhile, the hosts would rue the fact that they dropped three catches, including two of Stirling.

Earlier, Eoin Morgan’s blazing hundred had powered England to a substantial total. The visitors, who elected to bowl, started on the right note when Craig Young dismissed Jason Roy in the first over of the match. Mark Adair then castled Jonny Bairstow. However, England stuck to their tried and tested mantra of playing with a positive intent.

Morgan led from the front by cracking a flurry of shots including pulls, drives and lofts. Banton, who strode out to the middle at the fall of Vince’s wicket, gave Morgan the support, as the pair shared a timely 146-run stand. Banton and Morgan also crossed their respective milestones – fifty and hundred. Morgan, however, fell to Joshua Little, with Tector taking the catch at backward point.

Morgan’s wicket also opened the gates for Ireland to make further dents, with Banton and Moeen falling in quick succession. Sam Billings, who has been in good form in the series, also fell cheaply. With the score reading 216 for 7, Willey and Curran then propped up the home side with a wide range of shots. For the visitors, Young, Little and the impressive Campher shared seven spoils between them. (cricbuzz)

Brief scores: England 328 in 49.5 overs (Eoin Morgan 106, Tom Banton 58; Craig Young 3-53) lost to Ireland 329/3 in 49.5 overs (Paul Stirling 142, Andrew Balbirnie 113) by seven wickets.

 

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Winners from different regiments but from the same camp

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Where were they at school level?

by Reemus Fernando

When the Sri Lanka Army’s 55th Road Race concluded at Panagoda on Saturday, distance runners from three different regiments crossed the finish line to clinch the first three medals. Although they were from different units and regiments, they represented one particular ‘camp’. Quite conspicuously the joy of winning was something these champions had not enjoyed at national school level.

The South Asian Games medallist and the men’s category champion Shanmugeshwaran Kumara is from the Artillery Regiment. The second placed veteran Kelum Sampath Gunasekara is from the Sinha Regiment. Sagara Wijewickrama who was placed third is from Gemunu Watch. But what was common was that all three had trained under respected middle and long distance coach Sajith Jayalal.

Not only the first three, but also the fourth and sixth placed athletes were also trained by Jayalal.

Shanmugeshwaran clocked one hour ten minutes and 16 seconds to win. Gunasekara finished nearly 30 seconds after him while Wijewickrama returned a time of one hour eleven minutes and 16 seconds. The fourth placed S.D. Gunasekara was just six seconds behind him.

“Some of them had been directed to me by the Army while I had directed some to the Army so that they could persevere in athletics,” said Sajith Jayalal in an interview with The Island.

Incidentally, Shanmugeshwaran’s potential was identified by Jayalal when he came for training in 2013. Shanmu, as he is lovingly called, left Hatton to find employment in Colombo in 2011 and worked for two years at a car wash at Wellawatta before Jayalal helped him find employment in the Army. What he won on Saturday was the title hat trick following wins at the last two consecutive Road Races of the Army. Under Jayalal’s guidance Shanmugeshwaran graduated to win the silver medal of the 10,000 metres behind India’s Suresh Kumar at the last South Asian Games.

According to Shanmugeshwaran he had not won at school level.

As Jayalal puts it none of the winners on Saturday had won at national level when they were schooling. It is true of many long distance runners who are currently winning at national level. Even last Saturday’s women’s category winner Wathsala Herath (1:25.15 sec) trained by Susantha Fernando had taken up distance running only after leaving school.

“The third placed winner in the men’s category, Sagara Wijewickrama won gold at national level in track and events last year while he had not won at school level either. He had identified his potential in long distance running only after joining the Army.”

While Jayalal should be applauded for guiding the athletes to reach national level, authorities should have a serious look why the country’s schools structure fail in producing distance runners to national level.

There is hardly any encouragement for middle and long distance running at school level. Ministry of Education is careful to limit its engagement with long distance running to the annual race they hold with the support of Nestle Lanka.

Proposals given to encourage distance running at school level are hardly given consideration. In fact the Ministry of Education scrapped the distance relay from its annual Relay Carnival couple of years ago. There was a proposal to conduct a schools cross country championship but the Ministry of Education is still silent on the idea.

The time consuming process of obtaining medical certificates for schools athletes to engage in track events longer than that 1,500 metres has also discouraged principals and masters in charge at schools from fielding athletes for those events.

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Arjuna Ranatunga on Dean Jones

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I don’t think I have got too many friends in Australia but last week I lost a dear one – Dean Jones. Don’t get me wrong, he was one of fiercest competitors that I have come across playing two decades of Test cricket but off the field he was very friendly, unassuming and good natured guy.

We were contemporaries. He was two years older than me and made his Test debut two years after me.

People tend to measure the greatness of a player by judging whether he had done well in places like Australia or England. Well, that is up for debate. In that case, I reckon, we have to also see how players from England and Australia fared in places like India. That is why Dean Jones is such a special player. I am never one to read too much into numbers but I am told that Deano averaged something like 92 in India and that is a stat that any player, especially those from England and Australia can be proud of.

He was also a thorn in our flesh always making runs against us. Deano’s Test average of 60 and ODI average of 109 against us would tell you the story.

Deano was a very good analyst of the game. He understood complex situations and how to counter them. He was certainly a trend setter and there was much that we could learn from his game. His running between the wickets stood out and you had to be on your toes when he was out in the middle. His fielding was exciting as well and he brought in so much energy to the side. I am sure someone like Allan Border who had the task of rebuilding the Australian side following some high profile retirements valued the presence of Deano in the side.

Deano was very fond of Asian cricket. He spent lot of time in Sri Lanka doing commentaries and that gave us an opportunity to catch up. He spent quite a bit of time in other Asian countries as well.

I have lost a dear friend. Deano has left us too soon. My thoughts and prayers are with his family.

(World Cup winning Sri Lankan captain Arjuna Ranatunga was talking to The Island’s Rex Clementine)

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President’s Gold Cup Volleyball 2019

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A superb third set rally by Ranthuru Sports SC just fell short to beat Siyane Tharu Sports Club of Gampaha in the finals of the President’s Gold Cup Volleyball powered by Dialog Axiata, Sri Lanka’s premier connectivity provider.

 The final which was played-off at the National Youth Services Centre, Maharagama, the eventual winners, Siyane Tharu Sports Club, Gampaha beat Rantharu Sports SC, Debagama 03 sets to 02.

Siyatha Tharu won the, first set, 25-23, the second set by 25-16 and the decisive fifth and final set by 15-12, while losing the third set 21-25 and the fourth set 19-25.

While in the keenly contested women’s final, Golden Bird SC of Radawana beat Rathnapala SC of Mahausweva 03 sets to 01.

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