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Road accident tragedies vs COVID-19 success

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Having received tremendous applause from other countries for our excellent work in controlling the coronavirus, sadly, we have failed to bring discipline to our road users, namely the motorists. The worldwide death toll, from the COVID-19, stands at 691,971 and our contribution to this is just 11, whereas 157,905 from the US, 37,426 in neighbouring India, and 5973 from Pakistan, so far. The World Health Organization (WHO) has commended the steps taken by the Sri Lankan authorities to control COVID-19. Expressing her views, the WHO representative in Sri Lanka, Dr Razia Pendse, has said she admired the steps taken by Sri Lanka to control the virus through educating the public, easing unnecessary fears and carrying out quarantine in an effective way. We Sri Lankans are really proud of our health authorities, and the support they received from our forces, on the guidance of our President.

Can we also be commended for how we have fared in our road manners and road safety? Sadly, no! Motor accidents so far, in 2020, as per our record, stands at 8880, and road accidents have killed 921 people so far this year. The World Bank says Sri Lanka has the worst road fatality rates, with a report published by it saying Sri Lanka has the worst road fatality among its immediate neighbours, in the South Asia region. It added that Sri Lanka needed US $ 2 billion additional investments, over the coming decade, to achieve a 50% reduction in national road crash fatalities. The study, by the World Bank, further points out the estimated annual crash deaths per capita, in Sri Lanka, is twice the average rate in high-income countries, and five times that of the best performing countries in the world. As per report, 38,000 crashes happen annually, which resulted in around 3000 fatalities and 8000 serious injuries. This is attributed to the rapid growth in vehicle ownership in the country, which is already high by regional standards and grew by 67% between 2011 and 2018. If the trend continues, the number of accidents, and crash fatalities, will increase. However, we are of opinion that reckless and drunk driving also have contributed to the increase of road accidents and fatalities. We hope the government, which drew applause for controlling COVID-19, can succeed in bringing about control in road accidents, which have brought more fatalities than the virus in few countries.

S. H. MOULANA

 

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Opinion

Agriculture Dept. in a slumber

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The Department of Agriculture has been in a slumber for many years. Governments talk about developing agriculture in this country, but nothing happens. I am talking through experience. For the last several years I have been trying to obtain assistance from the department to fertilize my small coconut land and tea plantation, but with no success. In Galle my property is located about one km from the Highway on the Akuressa Road. I spoke to the officers through my cultivator at Walahanduwa and Labuduwa but the stock response is “SORRY the Government has not issued!” Do these officers ever visit these places ? ” NO”.

About two years ago I had to buy from a private trader to fertilize my coconut plants and part of my tea plantation. My profit is almost “NIL”. Due to lack of fertilizer the coconut crop dropped from five hundred nuts to 150/ nuts this month. Besides this, my buyer bought the coconuts @ of Rs 50/ per nut, whilst in Colombo I pay Rs 90/ per nut. Even, in my tea plantation there is a drop in the quantity of green leaf, as I have not fertilized it! Here too I am at the mercy of the buyer and have to accept whatever price he offers as there is no guaranteed price.

In my property I decided to plant cinnamon as it grows well along my fence , but the Agriculture Department told me that I will have to go to Matara to obtain plants, which is 28 miles from my place in Kalahe. Their attitude is very negative.

If one watches the Sinhala news on TV, it is quite evident that the Agriculture Department does nothing to encourage the cultivator in terms of providing fertilizer, advice against pests or even methods in improving the crop. Officers are warming their seats in the offices and never conduct field visits.

There is also no supervision or management by the Department. If from the head office they conduct surprise checks and visits, they will realise the exact situation. My visits to the branches indicated they are very poorly equipped in terms of furniture and equipment. It was found that they are poorly maintained and the premises, with broken furniture and unclean toilets, have never been swept or colour washed. A clear indication that none of the management teams from the head offices ever visit. The approaches to their offices are in a terrible state. Why cannot the management get these officers to provide a programme for the month, and get them to report on facts and figures, with acknowledgement from the growers being obtained with their comments; thus ensuring that the reports are genuine, and there must be sudden visits by the head office to these sites to check and supervise them. The department must adopt appropriate measures by giving proper directions to ensure that the cultivator/grower benefits from the department”. The Public are their Servants today.

The Vision of the Coconut Research Institute is to be the centre of excellence in coconut research technology, development and technology transfer in the region.

Its Mission – General knowledge and technology through excellence in research , towards increasing production & profitability of coconuts.

Its Mandate – 1. Maintain seed gardens.

2. Train advisory and extension workers to assist the coconut industry, guide & advise coconut industry on all matters of technical nature.

It is sad to say these so-called “Visions & Missions” are only on paper. Even the Mandate they talk about is also confined to paper! At grass root level “Nothing” happens.

There is no purpose in having any research and having great experts at the CRI, what matters is do the public benefit from them? It Is an Emphatic No!

No new seedlings are available. There is neither fertilizer nor expert advice. The Southern Province growers are completely neglected, as the so called institutions consist of incompetent and lazy officials who do not care about government or CRI policy. These CRI experts must not confine themselves to their offices; they must visit these places without giving them notice if they want to see what is happening.

 

NIHAL De ALWIS

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Opinion

Presidential words as orders

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At present two presidential inquiry commissions are working on – Easter Sunday Attack and Political Victimization. Many people come before these two commissions and mention many things that have been said/ordered by the former President, Prime Minister and various officials. It would be exceedingly difficult or impossible to check the veracity of those statements.

Now, incumbent President Gotabaya Rajapaksa asks/orders (or in a way threatens) government officials to take his spoken words as legitimate circulars. One day those officers too would have to come before various commissions and judicial courts, to justify the tasks they carried out on verbal orders by a President (may be solely to save themselves from being punished), and then who would be there to safeguard them?

A RATNAYAKE

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Opinion

‘Amude’ also tried in Parliament

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There has been furor on the dress code of NC Leader Athaullah who came to the parliament in a decent Afghan-style dress. I could remember in the years of yore, our friendly Dahanayake from my former electorate Galle, tried to come to the Parliament in an Amude, but cannot remember what followed. He tried to enter the Parliament in Amude (Span Cloth worn by farmers) to protest against the imposition by Mrs Bandaranaike in 1964 of a ration of two yards of textiles per month per person, at a time of grave shortage of foreign exchange.

 When Gandhi came to the British Parliament many decades ago – MPs referred to him as “Naked Pakir walking down the British parliament steps”, as he was dressed in 3/4th trouser style cloth for the down portion, and top part of the body was naked, except for a thin shawl draped over the body exposing parts of his chest. Also in the recent past an ex-president was attired in Modi Dress ( I am not sure if he came to the parliament) for the top part (similar to the top part of Afghan dress) and no one in the government like MP Marikkar or Harin Fernando protested.

Is the so-called Kapatiya Dress in white only admissible in parliament? What about full suits worn by brown sahibs / ex-Royal politicians – this is also a British dress; so why make a big fuss about an Afghan style decent dress. Kandyans are not protesting when down south bride grooms wear the Nilame style dress, which is trending these days?

 

SUMITH DE SILVA

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