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President must match his words with deeds

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President Gotabaya Rajapaksa accompanied by Army Commander General Shavendra Silva for the Army Day celebrations at Saliyapura

We were pleased to read the recent speech delivered at the 72nd anniversary of the Gajaba Regiment by President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, in which he admitted about the voter disillusionment in his government. We are aware that the government had to contend with unprecedented issues on account of the Covid epidemic, and had to give priority in seeking solutions to the challenges by imposing restrictions to the economic and social activities; while channelling limited resources to medical supplies and social service facilities.

If the President is prepared to review and turn a new page for the improvement of the country, one should expect the President to rehash the decision-making procedure of the Government. The voters are of the view that some of the crucial steps adopted, were either introduced or implemented in some instances, without recognising the impact on the country’s sovereignty and security.

As an initial step, the President should consider appointing a National Planning Committee with nationalist-minded experts, to work on a programme to tackle key economic issues and management of nationally important strategic centres for the next four years. Without proceeding ahead haphazardly and creating crisis situations, once such decisions are adopted, if the government can adhere to a plan with a nationalist vision, it will be acceptable to the voters who elected the President. Such a plan should also investigate the country’s priorities, future stability, resources, and national security. The implementation should be transparent and accountable.

Let us examine some of the issues which were tackled without a proper plan, which resulted in causing frustration and disappointment among the voters and the public. The method of overseeing the pricing and supply of commodities, such as sugar, rice, garlic, gas cylinders, etc was atrocious, which brought untold hardships to the consumer and to the producers. The complete mismanagement must be admitted by the government, and a more rational formula will have to be adopted, if the plan is to take the country systematically forward. It is necessary to exercise detailed examination of the supply chain, the storage facilities, and the Government outlets, to get rid of the unconscionable profiteers awaiting to fleece the consumers and marginalise the public organisations, which are established to protect the consumers. Once a rational decision is taken, the government should pursue the implementation with determination; rather than surrender to the dictates of the unscrupulous middlemen who hold onto the stocks, causing loss of confidence of the public.

A crucial area which needs urgent review is how to regulate luxury and semi-luxury imports, which consumes a considerable amount of foreign exchange earned by export of goods and services, including the foreign remittances of Sri Lankan workers. At least as a short term measure, the free trade introduced by JRJ about 40 years ago, should be re-examined and suitable qualitative controls should be introduced, to curb the outflow of foreign exchange for non-essential goods.

The President’s holistic decision on the banning of chemical fertiliser is, indeed, a step in the right direction, which will bring expected results in the improvement in soil and water quality and the general health of the masses. However, such a crucial decision was not followed professionally to ascertain the availability of other nutrients, and enough supply of compost fertiliser to apply in the following growing season. The unscientific method of managing the subject gave opportunities to many to engage in public agitation against this holistic decision.

It was, indeed, ironic to hear the slogans mouthed by ‘farmers’ of 2021 demanding chemical fertiliser, whereas their fathers were demonstrating in 1970s decrying the government’s and the officials’ dictates to replace bio-fertilizers with chemical fertiliser to ‘usher in thegreen revolution ‘. It is the wish of the majority of the population to get rid of the vicious cycle of poisoning, resulting from the use of chemical fertiliser, and we would request the government to take the required steps in the right direction to implement the laudable decision effectively and efficiently.

We need a clear and dedicated policy in relation to our international relations. We must always be nonaligned in our dealings with the big powers who are engaged in a global power game.

We should know the friendly nations who stood by Sri Lanka when it waged war with Tamil Tiger terrorists and subsequently at UNHCR, and about the other countries which attempted to crucify Sri Lanka for defeating the world’s most brutal terrorist organisation. Their attempts to continue persecuting Sri Lanka will naturally weaken the Sri Lankan state, and at all times Sri Lanka should express her rejection of such vicious attempts, and should bring these facts at bi-lateral discussions and multilateral conferences.

India, our neighbour, is leaving no stone unturned until we have PCs and with all powers. Most of the Sri Lankans do not want PCs, an additional tier of administration at a cost of colossal expenditure and with practically no benefits. At a time when Sri Lankans are required to tighten their belts and manage expenditure, the Government must convey to India that all issues can be managed under the present unitary system of Government. Sri Lanka should be noticeably clear on this issue to enable Sri Lanka-India international relationship to prosper. Sri Lanka should also continue bi-lateral discussions with India regarding oil tanks in Trinco, as to how these can be used for the economic development of the country, assuring that Sri Lanka will not allow any other country to have any control over the strategically important Trincomalee harbour. Recently an Indian writer has stated that India does not bother to understand her neighbouring countries, and decides on inter-state policies without considering the expectations of her neighbours. Imposing PCs on Sri Lanka and insistence on the implementation of the failed proposal emanated from the Indian centralised foreign policy machinery, which in this instance primarily addressed the aspirations of the Tamil Nadu agitators, who were expressing their support for the separatists in Sri Lanka. India’s strategy was to kill two birds with one stone, and executed its policy of proposing PCs to weaken the central government of Sri Lanka, while appeasing the extremists in Tamil Nadu to divert their attention from their own struggle for a separatist racist state in India. Sri Lanka should be firm in rejecting the Indian formula to destabilize the country, and continue to address the common issues faced by ordinary people in Sri Lanka, including the minorities living in the periphery.

The mandate given by the public clearly stated that the proportional representation system should be changed, and all future elections should be held according to the number of electorates, and members should represent the electorates based on the percentage of votes gained by the candidates. All who investigated into the system introduced by JRJ were of the view that the system breeds corruption and bribery, while precluding the visible representation of an electorate.

The President recently invited the expatriate Tamil groups, presumably as an effort to improve reconciliation of Sinhala and Tamil views and expectations. Such discussions should be based on specific conditions that the participants do not support separatism in Sri Lanka, and they accept a unitary Sri Lanka. Otherwise, such discussions will only provide opportunities to reopen the subject of traditional homelands, pushing the country back to the unenviable 1990s.

RANJITH SOYSA



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Opinion

Send them back to school!

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We are not talking about our children going back to school but about the request made by the Chief Opposition Whip Lakshman Kiriella to allow parliamentarians to enrol in the Sri Lankan Law College, or any other university, to further their studies. How about the basic qualification to enter university? Talking about the basic qualification we remember there was a talk some time ago about some members who have not got through even their GCE (O)Level, a bare minimum qualification, required even for a peon in a recognised organisation or in government services. We request the Chief Opposition Whip to request, on behalf of these members, to allow them to go back to school, no matter how old they are.

We remember one SAARC member country brought in a regulation saying that all those who come forward to contest a seat in the parliament should possess a university degree and at the submission of nomination the officials detected that nearly 20% of the certificates were fake. Anyway, we are proud that such things are extremely rare in our country.

Finally, I urge Kiriella to include schools, too, for MPs, who need the basic qualifications for university admission.

S. H. MOULANA

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Opinion

Compensate victims of gas explosions

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There is no shortage of hot topics for the media these days, the latest being the unusual occurrence of gas related accidents. Any ordinary person would understand that the present series of accidents are certainly due to the release of newly arrived consignment of gas cylinders whose composition ratio of propane and butane has been altered to maximise profits.

The responsible institutions and authorities as well as some ambidextrous politicians are defending the culprits who deny any change in the gas composition. The special committee appointed by the President to investigate into the matter, seem biased. The other day the public saw (through the TV news footages) that these so-called experts were trying to bully the innocent victims of these accidents, accusing them of the use of worn out hoses and regulators as the main reason for the incidents. Why the hell can’t they figure out the fact that these accidents are all due to the use of the newly bought wrongly filled cylinders. A committee of this nature is useless if its aim is to serve the vested interests. Instead of blaming the victims, one compulsory question they should ask is if the cylinder is newly bought or an old one. It is sad that this Kekille committee of experts is also trying to put the blame on the innocent consumer and defend the businessman.

All that the government should do at this critical hour is to introduce a mechanism to collect the data of the victims of these explosions and pay due compensation to them forthwith at the expense of the concerned gas company. The ministry in charge should also issue an urgent order to the company to recall the return of all these defective gas cylinders distributed to all districts and take immediate action for refilling them with the correct prescription of the chemical composition and issue with a new label giving all required instructions. In the meantime, the Consumer Protection Authority must ensure that accessories like the hoses and regulators, conforming to the SLS standards, are available in the market at least from now on for the safety of the consumers.

M. B. Navarathne

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Opinion

Banks make a killing at depositors’ expense

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The motive of the government decision to lower the interest rates of deposits was predominantly to engross the banks to lend at lower interest rates for entrepreneurs to boost the economy of the country which is in dire straits. However, would this proposal prove productive?

Owing to this absurd stunt senior citizens and pensioners have been left high and dry high and dry, resulting in unprecedented agony and anguish. Many victims have highlighted their grievances on behalf of the distraught senior citizens and pensioners. This much spoken of government’s harsh decision to lower interest rates has made the lives of senior citizen’s and pensioners miserable with the escalating high cost of living, skyrocketing cost of medical expenses, etc. It is pertinent to mention that monthly interest rates on fixed deposits, which they mostly rely upon, have been reduced to alarmingly low 4% and 5 % which has added to the woes already the senior citizens face.

All senior citizens who are not receiving or entitled for a pension, depend solely on monthly fixed deposit interest as the regular source of income for their living. As a result of lowering interest rates of deposits, their plans have all been shattered causing them to be wondering how to make ends meet.At this dire juncture, the intervention of the President is needed to revoke this unreasonable decision of lowering the interest rates of deposits.

The only redress the senior folk benefits is by the Central Bank’s special scheme of 15% interest for senior citizens. However, in this too the senior citizens have been slapped and battered with a Rs 1.5 million ceiling.

In comparison to the reduction of interest rates of deposits, if one takes into account the number of loans granted to entrepreneurs at lower interest rates the answer would be very negligible, particularly as the bank’s do not take risks to lend to entrepreneurs whom they believe to have projects not viable. The banks of course, would show enhanced profits at the end of the year as they have paid the depositors lower interest rates which reflects as plus mark for their balance sheets. This is a blessing in disguise for the management of banks at the receiving end of impoverished pensioners and senior citizens.

In the above contest the intervention of the President Gotabaya Rajapakse is most needed to bring about redress to ‘distressed” senior citizens and pensioners

Sunil Thenabadu

Brisbane, Australia

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