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Multi-sectoral collaboration vital for Sri Lanka to achieve Universal Health Coverage

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The Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka (IPS) together with the Sri Lanka Medical Association (SLMA) and the Center for Policy Impact in Global Health (CPIGH) of the Duke University, USA organised a virtual policy dialogue on ‘Planning for Universal Health Coverage amidst the 4Ds of Health Transitions’ on 25 August 2021. The dialogue was structured around a recent IPS study aimed at understanding how government, donors and key country stakeholders in the health sector perceive these transition challenges and their impact on the progress towards UHC, where they see the biggest gaps emerging, and what actions can help to address these challenges and gaps.

Health sector experts who spoke at the Dialogue flagged the need for multi-sectoral collaboration to achieve universal health coverage (UHC) in Sri Lanka.

Commencing the discussion, Dr Nisha Arunatilake, Director of Research, IPS explained that there are four major, inter-linked transitions in diseases, demography, development assistance for health and domestic health financing – the “4Ds” of global health transition – that complicate Sri Lanka’s efforts to achieve UHC. The associated challenges of these have been worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, IPS and Duke University have conducted research that brings into focus the importance of achieving UHC and the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Speaking next, Dr Padma Gunaratne, President, SLMA reflected on some of the achievements of the national health system including increased life expectancy and quality of healthcare. She noted that while these achievements are commendable, inequities and inefficiencies in healthcare continue to persist and a meaningful dialogue on planning for UHC is most timely.

Delivering the keynote address thereafter, Dr S Sridharan, Deputy Director-General (Planning), Ministry of Health pointed out that donor support for the health sector is declining. Meanwhile, there is rising demand for health services, an ageing population, and inadequate domestic financing for health. He recommended seven steps to address the challenges: (1) strengthening community response systems; (2) supporting reproductive health – adolescence, maternity and new-born health; (3) supporting platforms for integrated service delivery; (4) strengthening country population and supply chain; (5) investing in human resources (HR) for health and data systems for health; (6) strengthening and aligning national and global strategies; and (7) strengthening financial management and oversight.

The next speaker, Ipchita Bharali, Policy Associate, Duke University provided the audience with evidence on health transitions in an international context. She stated that many Middle-Income Countries (MICs) are expected to transition away from concessional multilateral and bilateral development assistance soon. However, they still face several health sector challenges such as high mortality rates, weak health systems, and large pockets of poverty in the countries. These challenges are intensified with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Session 1: Knowledge, capacity, and policy gaps that hinder UHC progress in Sri Lanka in the context of the 4Ds of health transitions and potential opportunities to tackle these gaps.

Knowledge gaps and opportunities

Ashani Abayasekara, Research Economist, IPS presented a summary of the study findings identifying the knowledge gaps. One of the findings highlighted was the rising burden of NCDs, as there was an acute focus on curing such illnesses by only considering drugs as the solution and understanding them as disease issues and not health issues. Prominence was also given to the gender disparities regarding NCDs. Lack of detailed and accurate data, poor research and development (R&D), and knowledge dissemination were some of the many gaps that were further identified as areas that needed immediate action.

Dr Susie Perera, Deputy Director-General (Public Health Services II), Ministry of Health in her reflections explained that one of the ways of alleviating the gaps is by targetted investments and incentivising stakeholders to conduct proper R&D, data collection, and knowledge dissemination. She noted that Sri Lanka has had many opportunities to strengthen its primary health and education systems with donor support, both of which are relevant to reducing the NCD burden. “A whole of government, multi-sector approach is needed,” she emphasised adding that digital literacy needs to be fostered in the health sector, along with a culture of innovation.

Prof. Amala De Silva, Professor in Economics, University of Colombo shared similar sentiments and noted that NCDs have an indirect relationship with economic performance. She flagged the need for multidisciplinary studies and proper accountable agency in research activities to achieve UHC in Sri Lanka.

Capacity gaps and opportunities

Thisali de Silva, Research Assistant, IPS presented the findings of the study on the capacity gaps that hinder UHC in the country. Poor financial and HR capacity was found to be the notable gaps in Sri Lanka. Some of the financial capacity gaps included inefficiencies in financial allocation, and financial management issues to name but two. On the other hand, the lopsided distribution of medical professionals and the lack of engagement in the financial side of the health sector have made for concerning capacity gaps in labour.

First to give thoughts on the study was Dr Dileep de Silva, Head of Human Resource Department, Ministry of Health. On the HR front, he explained that the issue in the lopsided distribution of medical professionals was due to the low applicants especially when looking at nurses, therapists, midwives and PHIs. Furthermore, one of the major reasons for the financial capacity gaps is a result of the underutilisation of capital budgets for the health sector.

Dr Anuji Gamage, Senior Lecturer in Community Medicine, Sir John Kotelawala Defence University identified healthcare migration as a problem driven by economic factors, unsatisfactory work environment, and professional career opportunities. She stated that a way of solving the uneven distribution of labour is a mechanism that would assure safety, and this is particularly important in a time of a global pandemic. “It is important to use strategies to keep the workforce safe and improve their wellbeing,” she affirmed.

Policy gaps and opportunities

The frequent changes made to the number of ministries, reversal of implemented policies and several other implementation hurdles, especially at the provincial level were shown to be some of the major policy gaps identified through the study. Ashani Abayasekara highlighted several opportunities to focus amid all these gaps such as creating a knowledge hub, and collaboration and coordination with non-state sectors.

Dr Ruvaiz Haniffa, Past President, SLMA in his reflections, called for a grassroots level approach through family doctors and homecare. “Too many people are currently missing out on health coverage in the primary preventive care sector. We have not put in policies in the primary curative sector,” he said stressing that the need of the hour is to provide holistic primary curative care. Uditha Palihakkara (Past Chairman of the Finance Commission), speaking in his personal capacity, expressed the view that the policy gaps are a result of low national budgets to the health sector as a whole.

Session 2: Multi-sectoral collaboration for Sri Lanka’s health systems – reflections from development partners, private sector, academia and civil society.

Based on the study, Dr Deepika Attygalle, Senior Health Specialist, World Bank and Ms Shiranthi Rathnayake, Additional Director General, Department of National Planning asserted that multi-sectoral collaboration is vital for Sri Lanka’s goal of achieving UHC of which, collaboration between the finance and medical sectors is particularly important. Dr Olivia Nieveras, Public Health Administrator, World Health Organization spoke about how donors should more agile in their activities. Sampath Manthreenayake, Additional Director-General, Department of External Resources added that there should be a collective system for better results on donor financing.

Way Forward

Moderated by Dr Nisha Arunatilake, a fruitful question and answer session took place with several important questions raised from participants around the world. The proceedings were wrapped up with an iteration on the need for a strong primary curative healthcare system and multi-sectoral collaborations as the way forward.

Link to original blog: https://www.ips.lk/talkingeconomics/2021/08/27/multi-sectoral-collaboration-vital-for-sri-lanka-to-achieve-universal-health-coverage/



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DFCC Bank’s Ranwarama pawning facility lends a helping hand to those with urgent cash requirements

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DFCC Bank has increased the advances of its “DFCC Ranwarama” Pawning Facility as a solution for families to meet their urgent cash requirements as many families are experiencing financial difficulties due to the COVID-19 outbreak that has had a significant impact on the Sri Lankan economy.

Through this scheme, all Sri Lankan citizens over 18 years of age with the contractual capacity to declare themselves as owners of the articles can now pawn gold or gold jewellery. DFCC Bank accepts jewellery made of 18 Karat -24 Karat gold, with the articles being assayed using the latest available equipment. Items of 24 Karate will hold an advanced value of LKR 82,000/-, while 22 Karat pieces will hold an advanced value of LKR 68,000/- at an interest rate of 0.75% per month. Those who engage in these transactions are provided a maximum of 12 months to settle the pawning advances at their convenience.

DFCC Bank’s Ranwarama Pawning Facility offers many other special features including the highest advance amount at competitive rates of interest, confidentiality and guaranteed security for the articles, flexible payment plans with redemption options when required and redemption without prior notification. All of these facilities are available with no hidden charges, offering customers the best service available in the market.

You may visit a DFCC Bank branch closest to you to transact or visit the Bank’s website at www.dfcc.lk for further information. Customers can also contact DFCC Bank’s 24-hour contact center on +94(11)2350000 for further inquiries.

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HSBC Sri Lanka recognised as the Best Consumer Digital Bank by Global Finance

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HSBC has been recognised as the Best Consumer Digital Bank in Sri Lanka for 2021 by Global Finance at the World’s Best Consumer Digital Banks Awards in Asia-Pacific. While this is the bank’s fourth award win for this year, this also marks the 13th time that HSBC Sri Lanka has been named the Best Consumer Digital Bank, since 2006.

HSBC Sri Lanka is also the only market in Asia Pacific to win the prestigious award this year.

According to Global Finance, the global health crisis accelerated the need for digital and contact-free solutions by banks in helping create safe and efficient banking services for customers. HSBC Sri Lanka was quick to react in supporting customers in providing seamless digital bank offerings in an increasingly demanding environment, while ensuring customers have a secure banking service with a full spectrum of client-centric banking services.

Through its wealth of digital capabilities and offerings, HSBC allowed customers to adopt a mobile-first approach, and provide them with faster, easier and more secure banking services 24/7. The bank introduced a virtual on boarding capability for account opening, loans and credit cards supported by Adobe Live Sign, eKYC and virtual PINs to provide a seamless on boarding experience for customers. HSBC also offers credit card activation through SMS and an e2e virtual registration process for online banking, offering a virtual banking experience.

In Sri Lanka more than 90% of its personal customers now use digital channels including mobile banking, e-wallets, real-time cash deposit machines and other digital services.

Nadeesha Senaratne, Country Head of Wealth & Personal Banking said, “We are truly honoured to be named the Best Consumer Digital Bank in Sri Lanka for 2021 by Global Finance in recognition of our digital capabilities, and delivering important everyday services and features that customers need and expect. As a leading international bank, we are putting the power of our bank in every customer’s pocket, with easier and more secure digital banking. We want to take the hassle out of everyday banking, and enable customers to easily manage their money online, from opening a new account in a few clicks, to making real time payments and accessing credit.”

Senaratne added: “We’re also blending the power of technology with the expertise of our people and empowering our frontline teams with the latest data and insights tools, to be better-equipped to check customer satisfaction in the moment, to understand, and respond to their evolving needs and give customers excellent service.”

Winners were selected by a world-class panel of judges and entries were judged based on the strength of strategy for attracting and servicing digital customers, success in getting clients to use digital offerings, growth of digital customers, breadth of product offerings and evidence of tangible benefits gained from digital initiatives.

Earlier this year, HSBC Sri Lanka was also named International Bank of the Year by Asiamoney and Finance Asia respectively, and International Retail Bank of the Year by Asian Banking & Finance.

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BoardPAC appointed Strategic Partner of Commonwealth’s Business Network – CWEIC

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BoardPAC, the Sri Lanka-based multinational Board meeting automation solutions company, has been appointed a Strategic Partner of the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council (CWEIC), the organisation officially mandated by the Commonwealth Heads of Government to promote trade and investment between the 54 Commonwealth member countries.

This prestigious appointment will see CWEIC relying on BoardPAC’s award-winning solutions to conduct board and committee meetings with members and maintain relationships across the Commonwealth network at a time when the global pandemic’s complete disruption of business activity has resulted in a surge in the demand for efficient board meeting automation.

The Company said the partnership will also effectively promote the BoardPAC platform to new users and facilitate its expansion into new territories and focus markets. BoardPAC already has a global user base in excess of 50,000 and a presence in more than 40 countries.

Noting that BoardPAC’s latest partnership serves as yet another testament to the quality of its solutions, BoardPAC Co-Founder/CEO, Lakmini Wijesundera stated: “Our growth plan includes expanding our worldwide network, and our strategic alliance with CWEIC will strongly help us extend our presence into Commonwealth territories. The strategic cooperation between CWEIC and BoardPAC is especially relevant in light of the worldwide pandemic, and the emerging need for secure remote working and filling the void in virtual board meetings.”

CWEIC Chairman, Rt. Hon. Lord Jonathan Marland said: “We are looking forward to work closely with BoardPAC. The alliance will not only help CWEIC to conduct virtual board meetings securely and safely, but also align ourselves with all governance, risk and compliance as well as environmental, social, and governance frameworks.” Echoing this sentiment, CWEIC Deputy Chair, Sir Hugo Swire stated: “We are excited to partner with BoardPAC and extend modern digital governance and compliance solutions to organisations operating in the Commonwealth.”

Disclosing that BoardPAC’s excellent track record inspired confidence within the CWEIC to implement its solution on a global scale, CWEIC Chief Executive, Samantha Cohen CVO added: “We’re delighted that BoardPAC, one of the most renowned virtual board meeting automation providers in the world, joined our network of Strategic Partners. BoardPAC will add significant value to our board and committee meetings, allowing the CWEIC to conduct meetings with its members throughout the Commonwealth more effectively. The partnership also demonstrates the opportunities within the Commonwealth, and the confidence businesses have towards the Commonwealth and CWEIC.”

A commercial, not-for-profit membership organisation, the Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council’s network includes around 100 business and government Strategic Partners (members) including Standard Chartered, Zenith Bank, Trade & Investment Queensland and the Government of the Maldives from 30 countries and territories. Every two years, CWEIC hosts the Commonwealth Business Forum in association with the host country of The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM).

BoardPAC is an award winning, multinational, paperless board meeting automation solutions provider, recognised for driving simple, secure, sustainable and experiential communications for Board and Executive members. Leading corporates such as Petronas, Deloitte, EY, Mercedes Benz, Prudential, Hong Leong Group, Stock Exchange of Malaysia, Central Bank of Sri Lanka, Bombay Stock Exchange, Bank Negara, Maybank, Power Grid Corporation of India, Colombo Stock Exchange, and Sri Lankan Airlines are just some of BoardPAC’s success stories, and the Company said the partnership with the CWEIC will pave the way to several more high-profile additions to this list.

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