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A PORTENT OF THINGS TO COME: waiting to die in Uda Walawe

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by Rohan Wijesinha

A New Year spells new beginnings and brings with it the hope of things better. This year, it dawned very differently at the Uda Walawe National Park. The officers of the Department of Wildlife Conservation (DWC) were on a mission of mercy. A large bull elephant had been shot; the bone and muscle of the knee of his back left leg had been shattered. It had swollen to many times its normal size, and needed urgent treatment. The shooting had taken place outside of the Park, and the DWC officers had to entice this beautiful creature back into it, with food and elephant delicacies, to keep him safe from more human torture, and to try and treat his wounds. Despite the extent of his injuries, they managed to tempt him in, a considerable trek in his condition. In his prime, large and full of life, this big bull now faced the biggest challenge to his existence; to heal from human harm.

When death is a release

Six weeks later, and the DWC officers were trying to move him again, away from the edges of the Park, perhaps so that he could die in peace, away from the prying eyes of those who might otherwise exult in his sad ending. Time, even this short span of time, had taken heavy toll. Despite the every effort of the DWC officers, the swelling had now trebled in size, and was oozing with foul smelling suppurate. The once proud beast, now an emaciated hulk, blind in one eye, perhaps the result of a previous bullet, shuffled along the road in obvious pain. His left back leg crumpled every time it took his weight, and with each step, more pus oozed out of the swollen mass of rotting flesh.

We may never know why he was shot, or why he deserved to be if such a justification can ever be made, but the placement of the bullet clearly showed that it was to hurt and not to instantly kill. Yet, with a political leadership seemingly intent on the decimation of the wildlife and wilderness areas of Sri Lanka, this will be just one of the many tragedies waiting to play out on lands that were once prized by our ancient rulers and peoples for their sanctity, serenity and life-giving powers, and were the foundation of this country’s prosperity.

Murdering the future

A government that wages war on its own people is referred to as a Dictatorship but, usually, exists for just the lifespan of that particular rule as not even tyrants can live forever. History shows that power soon returns to the people, and sanity prevails once more. Those who wage war on Nature and the environment, however, are Demons that are intent on destroying the futures of all who come after them. They have no comprehension of tomorrow but believe that their today is all that matters, a final generation. Though the ‘future’ is bound to curse them for their callous destruction of it, they will no longer be there to suffer the consequences of their wickedness. Their children will be sent to live elsewhere, though as the climate heats up, due to deforestation and environmental destruction, there may be nowhere else to live. Nature does not adhere to manmade boundaries – those constructed by states or individuals. A lack of water, polluted air and inadequate supplies of food will bring as slow and as lingering a death to humanity, as it is today coming to the dying bull elephant in the Uda Walawe National Park.

The Government has now determined that any farmer with over an acre of arable land is to be given guns to protect their crops from wildlife. It is estimated that there are approximately two million who will so qualify. Sri Lanka’s famous fauna, those exotic creatures with whom we share this Island and who attract many visitors to our shores, will be the victims of this slaughter. The massacre will be apocalyptic. It will not only be elephants who will be targeted, but any creature that nears human cultivation and habitation.

There is also a matter of National security. In the last 50 years Sri Lanka has suffered the consequences of three major insurrections; two in the South and one in the North. There has been a rise in the levels of domestic violence. Will these guns be used against animals alone?

Give a child a gun, and who is responsible? It is clear as to who should be held to account for every human and animal death that results from this irresponsible political initiative. This is not being done for the benefit of farmers for if it was, the forests would be fiercely protected for they are the bringers of rain, and the precious water needed for agriculture. Wild animals are an essential component of a healthy ecosystem. This is nothing but for the benefit of the policymakers and the money they, and their henchmen, can make from selling this precious natural heritage to large corporate entities who will rape it for what it can give them, and in the shortest possible time. Nothing but barren, waterless earth will remain for those who are left to try and scrape a pittance from the residue – the true farmers.

The Final Generation?

Historians, if there are any left, will refer to this as the Final Age as biodiversity disappears, and natural systems begin to collapse. There would be no point in appealing to our Gods to sustain us as this destruction would have been orchestrated by men who delude themselves that they are divine and not just above the Laws of Men, but those of Nature too. They, long ago, abandoned their worship of the just by building graven images of themselves with the materials they had plundered, and continue to steal, from the Earth.

If only we could save it for the future, for the younger generations are far more aware of the value of Nature and the need to preserve it, intact, for the health and life of all? They are the hope of tomorrow. Are we going to stand by quietly and let them be robbed of their inheritance especially as there are so many ways for us to coexist with Nature, and benefit from its blessings? Or do we, too, believe that ours is the final generation?

“Human kind of one generation holds the guardianship and conservation of the natural resources in trust for future generations…A sacred duty to be carried out with the highest level of accountability.”

Justice Shiranee Thilakawardena (in Watte Gedara Wijebanda v Conservator General of Forests and Others 2009 1 SLR 337 at p. 338)

 



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Two centuries tick by on Dockyard clock

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The Belfry Gate of the Trincomalee Naval Dockyard, a national architectural monument, is unknown to many. The once twin-towered belfry is now a single tower with its twin long gone. It has served as loyal timekeeper for sailors in the dockyard for 200 years and continues to do so

by Randima Attygalle

The strategically located natural deep water harbour in Trincomalee has been coveted by traders and colonists since ancient times. The earliest reference to this port of call once known as ‘Gokanna’ is found in Mahavamsa – the great chronicle of Sri Lanka. During the colonial days, Trincomalee or Trinco as it’s commonly called, was occupied by the Portuguese, Dutch, French and the British. The fort which was built by the Portuguese to keep rival sea faring nations at bay was expanded by the Dutch.

The British captured Trincomalee from the Dutch in 1795 during the Napoleonic Wars. Under the Treaty of Amiens of 1802, the Dutch ceded Ceylon to the British. H.A Colgate in his, The Royal Navy and Trincomalee- the history of their connection (The Ceylon Journal of Historical and Social Studies, Volume 1, Issue 1) documents that ‘in the days of sail, Trincomalee owed its importance to the variations of the monsoon, the prevailing winds in the Indian Ocean. A squadron defending India had to lie to the windward of the continent. It also required a safe harbour in which to shelter during the violent weather occasioned by the change of the monsoons in October and to a less extent in April. Only Trincomalee could fulfill these conditions. Thus its use was the key to the defence of India and the inestimably valuable British trade with India and China, which passed through the adjacent seas.’

The British used Trinco as an anchorage for Royal Navy ships in the Indian Ocean and when the steam powered ships were launched, the Royal Navy erected a coaling station to support bases throughout the British empire. Lieutenant Commander (Rtd) Somasiri Devendra, an authority on maritime archaeology, says that the Royal Navy constructed all its dockyard-related buildings along the coastline at the entrance to the port.

“The buildings were completed by 1812 and soon after this, the conclusion of the Napoleonic wars ended the threat to the Royal Navy from the French and the Dutch and the expansion of the dockyard was halted. Trincomalee became a backwater for most of the 19th Century with its major role being that of a coaling station. Coal was stored in bulk on old ships at anchor known as coaling hulks.”

Devendra explains that all buildings within the dockyard premises were accessed through the gates popularly known as Belfry Gates. These with their twin towers were built by the British in 1821. Only one tower remains today. The exact reason for the demolition of the twin and when it was done is not established. It is presumed that one of the towers was demolished when roads were being widened for heavier traffic. “This must have been somewhere between the first and the second World Wars,” says Devendra.

Most of the civilian labour working for the Navy lived outside the dockyard and the bell possibly would have been rung to mark the time of opening and closing of the gate, he said.

“The large house near the dockyard gate known as as Belfry House in which I once lived is now two houses,” he recollects. The belfry gate stands where three roads meet, marked by a traffic light believed to be the first in the country. The lights that still work well were probably needed to manage and ensure the safety of numerous vehicles carrying building material, ammunition, artillery, spare parts, and sailors and soldiers who were busy fortifying the naval dockyard and attending to the needs of ships and craft anchored in the harbour.

“When I got my driving license, there was only one set of traffic lights in Colombo – at the Kollupitiya junction. So the Trinco traffic light is probably the first in the country,” says Devendra. He adds that one of the roads controlled by these lights goes uphill to the Dutch Fort Ostenburg where the Dockyard Signal Station was situated. “It’s a steep road through forest and made of concrete, supposedly the first such road built here.”

Those who served in the Dockyard remember the belfry very well. “Traditionally, when naval officers who long served there are transferred they’re presented a replica of this landmark for display in their homes to remember their time at the dockyard,” says Rear Admiral (Rtd) Niraja Attygalle who had served many years there during his naval career.

“Two hundred years is certainly a long period for a clock to tick giving the accurate time for men in white and men in overalls in workshops as well as for naval civilian workers in the dockyard. Also, the gear mechanism and electrical circuits of the traffic lights still work perfectly.”

The responsibility of maintaining both the belfry clock and traffic lights lie with the technical staff of the dockyard and their work needs to be appreciated, says Attygalle. “Even though the original bell has not rung for years to ensure its conservation, a smaller version has taken over that duty. The quartermaster of today’s Navy Dock, standing in the shadow of the belfry, announces the time by ringing the bell as done onboard on a man-o’-war,” he says.

Although unknown to many, the Naval Dockyard Belfry which marks its bicentennial this year (its exact date of unveiling is unknown) is an iconic landmark. “This unique structure reflecting British architecture during the occupation of the Dockyard by the Royal Navy must be acknowledged for its 200-year history as part and parcel of the Dockyard fraternity,” reflects Deputy Area Commander (East), Rear Admiral Anura Danapala. “Every single Naval Officer and sailor serving today and those who have retired will undoubtedly recall with sentimental pride, the unique service the belfry has rendered over two centuries.”

“The belfy had been the timekeeper for the naval fraternity in the dockyard and may it continue to serve for several more centuries,” says the officer.

(Pic credit: Somasiri Devendra, Niraja Attygalle)

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Subtle make-up to make you glow

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by Zanita Careem

Ramani Fernando, beautician and hairstylist has many experience in the beauty industry ,. juggling homelife while climbing up the corporate ladder. She is a lover of minimalism! on par with international beauticians: She creates signature styles that are one of a kind.You must be a marketeer of yourself in order to establish trust, respect and support amongst your clientele says Ra,ami .

A self possessed ‘beauty icon’ Ramani knows how to sell herself, with her charming demeanor, she offers the total package of beauty and brain.

What is beauty?

To me beauty is an energy, we all possess that comes from the soul and radiates through the skin and face. Beauty is personal but it is also universal. Beauty is everywhere and it inspires us all the time.

Make up is indefinite, it has many possibilities of making someone confident For me it took me sometime to step out of my comfort zone and use different colours on different people, but when I started there was no stopping, it was admired by many clients,Most importantly, when clients pay me compliments I am so happy. Beauty industry is challenging and this challenges honed my artistic skills.

Beauty comes from within and everyone has a way of portraying thier looks by colours. Makeup simply enhance s ‘ an individual’s existing features.

How would you describe your makeup style and what sets you apart from others What are your signature styles as an artist?

I am an individual and as an individual I have own creative styles to suit one’s facial looks and features. Nothing can beat the feeling of making someone feel and look beautiful.

What is your beauty philosophy?

I strongly believes in natural beauty. I believe that behind every face there is individuality, which becomes evident from client to client my style differs widely from others. I apply makeup to suit one facial feature and to fit their personality. My signature style is creating a flawless finish complemented with neutral colours on the eyes. It is simple, clean, sophisticated and elegant.

How do you keep up with all the new trends and styles?

Where do you find your inspiration for your makeup looks?

I always keep in mind to watch on TV international fashion shows and trends In my travels.I am inspired by all things around me

In your opinion. What are common mistakes you see women make on their makeup

?

The most common mistakes are bold dark lines on brows.The lipliner should not be too harsh.

What do make up artists do?

Makeup Artists are professionals with artistic skills and they are experts in the use of colours to enhance the beauty and physical attributes.

How do you get your start in the industry?

After travelling to UK, I saw an opportunity to develop my skills, I started working as a junior stylist in a very popular salons in Harrow.

It was at this point that I discovered the potential in me. I came back to Sri Lanka with many innovative ideas. I soon became a trail blazer in the industry, new techniques and new innovative ideas used in my salon that were not available at the time. became the talk of the town.

What do you love most about makeup?

It’s a passion that I loved . I wanted to make people feel more confident with new styles and colours,

Does everyone look better with make up?

Personally, all women are beautiful with or without makeup. It really depends on the individual and their purpose of why they choose to wear makeup. I agree, makeup can completely change the appearance of a women. However, some people who have more blemishes on their faces, acne or any other skin issues usually benefit more from wearing extra pigmented creams and powders in order to lesson the effects of skin imperfections. A strict beauty regime is a must. A good foundation talks volumes about your beaty and looks

What do brides ask for in the post-covid era?

This entire pandemic has made everyone so cautious. It doesn’t change much for brides. When the bride/family decides to go through with the wedding, nothing changes for the bride. She still wants to look the best, she wants her makeup to last through all her functions, She wants to be free of stress and strains So, when it comes to what they’re asking, they aren’t asking for much or anything different

What are your safety measures?

At the end of the day, it’s about who you book as your artiste and how much about the safety in mind.

Do you offer trial makeup?

YES – I not only offer trial makeup, but I also emphasize it. Irrespective of whether they are busy or travelling or whatever may the reason be, it is important. For the simplest reason that if anything needs to be changed or needs to be figured out, it can be done in due time and not the day of the wedding. The best part about having a trial is you can experiment not only with one but with as many styles as you like and finalize what you like best so you know exactly what is happening and you are stress-free on the day of your wedding. It also gives you the opportunity to bond with your bride so she can trust you to deliver your best work on one of her most important day.

How have things changed for you in these times?

2020 has actually been quite a game-changer because it’s something that nobody had imagined could happen; for the whole world to come to a standstill. Like everyone was living through a fast-paced life and someone just hit the pause button. It has affected a lot of businesses because nobody wants to step out and take a chance or risk their health or that of their loved ones – which is the right thing to do right now as well. I think that is the major change this year.

What advice would you give brides that are planning to get married in 2020-21?

They should match their face mask with their bridal trousseau… ha-ha just kidding but on a serious note, the advice for brides planning to get married this year or in the coming year is that NOT let the pandemic dampen their spirits. It is still their day; they still deserve to look the best and feel the best on their wedding day. So, engage an artist they like but also someone who is high on safety standards.

What are the trends in bridal makeup/hairstyles are in right now?

Fashion, Styles, and Trends are indispensable. They don’t go away. What has been trending is the concept of natural beauty and people understand the meaning of natural beauty and they want to see themselves as more than just makeup and that is also the beauty of it. When you do Airbrush makeup or HD makeup, it’s about accentuating your natural beauty. That is what today’s trends are about. It is basically only playing with natural beauty and highlights and contours. Makeup has never been something that you just go in and do. It is about seeing the face and understanding the structure and then creating a look. You have to understand where exactly a contour stops and how much depth you need to give a face and what parts of the face need highlighting. That, I think is something artists know and a professional will understand and is what is trending right now.

What are brides asking for in the post-covid era?

This entire pandemic has made everyone so cautious. It doesn’t change much for brides. When the bride/family decides to go through with the wedding, nothing changes for the bride. She still wants to look the best, she wants her makeup to last through all her functions, she still wants to be treated like the bride and not have any stress.

At the end of the day, it’s about who you book as your artiste and how much you trust them to know they have your safety in mind.

Do you offer trial makeup?

YES – I not only offer trial makeup, but I also emphasize it. Irrespective of whether they are busy or travelling or whatever may the reason be, it is important. For the simplest reason that if anything needs to be changed or needs to be figured out, it can be done in due time and not the day of the wedding. The best part about having a trial is you can experiment not only with one but with as many styles as you like and finalize what you like best so you know exactly what is happening and you are stress-free on the day of your wedding. It also gives you the opportunity to bond with your bride so she can trust you to deliver your best work on one of her most important day.

How have things changed for you in these times?

2020 has actually been quite a game-changer because it’s something that nobody had imagined could happen; for the whole world to come to a standstill. Like everyone was living through a fast-paced life and someone just hit the pause button. It has affected a lot of businesses because nobody wants to step out and take a chance or risk their health or that of their loved ones – which is the right thing to do right now as well. I think that is the major change this year.

What advice would you give brides that are planning to get married in 2020-21?

They should match their face mask with their bridal trousseau… that is if possible. The advice for brides planning to get married this year or in the coming year is NOT let the pandemic dampen their spirits. It is still your day; they still deserve to look the best and feel the best on their wedding day. So, engage an artiste they like but also someone who is high on safety standards.

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Conserving Horton Plains: What the Science Tells Us

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WNPS Monthly Lecture

by Dr Rohan Pethiyagoda

Pix by Ranjan Josiah

20th May 2021, 6.00 pm, via Zoom

Just about everyone who visits a protected area in Sri Lanka comes away with many ideas of how its management could be improved, and Horton Plains is no exception. Despite its small size, Horton Plains is one of our country’s most unique and priceless biodiversity assets—and sadly it faces graver threats than most other protected areas. Over-visitation, fires, alien species, pest species, illegal mining, forest dieback, population declines, pollution, climate change… the list goes on and on.

While a great deal of research has been done on most of these problems, translating scientific findings into management interventions remains a formidable challenge. In this lecture, Rohan Pethiyagoda explores the threats that confront Horton Plains and discusses how he could respond to these. The solutions he proposes are often provocative, controversial, and perhaps even aggressive—but unless these recommendations are openly discussed among serious-minded conservationists, the decline of this jewel in the crown of Sri Lankan biodiversity is set to continue. The 40-minute lecture will be followed by an extended discussion time so that listeners can ask questions or challenge the solutions he offers.

Dr. Rohan Pethiyagoda is a biodiversity scientist who has published widely on Sri Lanka’s fauna and flora. He has published more than 60 research papers, in addition to authoring several books on Sri Lanka’s fauna and flora, through the Wildlife Heritage Trust (WHT), a foundation he endowed in 1991. WHT built up Sri Lanka’s largest specimen collection for research, which was gifted to the National Museum in 2009.

WHT has also helped several outstanding young biodiversity researchers expand their careers by undertaking postgraduate research and some 150 new species were discovered and described through this work. Rohan is also an editor of the journal Zootaxa, has headed several state entities, served as Environment Advisor to the government, and as deputy chair of the Species Survival Commission. He has won wide international recognition for his work, including a Rolex Award.

Conducted successfully over two decades, the Wildlife & Nature Protection Society’s Monthly Lecture series plays an important role in sharing scientific information and knowledge with the public and also acts as a launchpad for conservation initiatives. Please join us online at this month’s WNPS Monthly Lecture, focusing on Horton Plains National Park and what science tells us, about its future.

The WNPS Public Lecture is presented in association with Nations Trust Bank and open to all

Please sign up here https://forms.gle/GSAjK2S1kPBDWD7h7

 

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